Tag Archives: Trend

My latest Gartner research: Market Trends: Is Public Cloud Adoption Making Traditional Firewall Solutions Less Relevant?

12 December 2017  |  This research highlights the key trends in public cloud that are impacting the firewall market. Technology product management leaders of firewall providers need to understand the forces that are beginning to disrupt end-user demand to improve competitive strategies and product positioning….

Gartner clients can access this research by clicking here.




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My latest Gartner research: Cool Vendors in Security Intelligence, 2015

Cool Vendors in security intelligence offer highly innovative technologies that address an organization’s demand for data-driven analytics, techniques in obfuscation and deception, and advanced detection solutions. CISOs should use this research when evaluating technology trends for planning. … illusivenetworks.com ) Analysis by Avivah Litan and Lawrence Pingree Why Cool: Illusive networks offers advanced attack deception … California ( trapx.com ) Analysis by Craig Lawson, Lawrence Pingree and Oliver Rochford Why Cool: TrapX Security is …

Gartner clients can access this research by clicking here.


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[ISN] Why Silicon Valley Hackers Still Won’t Work With the Military, and Vice Versa

http://motherboard.vice.com/read/why-silicon-valley-hackers-still-wont-work-with-the-military-and-vice-versa By Kari Paul Contributor Motherboard.vice.com February 26, 2015 In the fight to defend cyberspace from its enemies, the US military is rushing to hire as many skilled hackers as it can. But no one is really sure how to get the two cultures to coexist. Although the feds have implied they’re willing to loosen up some of their policies so that weed-smoking, basement-dwelling hacker stereotypes can work for government agencies, there are still some significant hurdles preventing the two industries from working together in earnest. At the first annual Future of War Conference on Wednesday, a panel of experts weighed in on the simmering Silicon Valley culture clash after an audience member asked why the US doesn’t just militarize Silicon Valley if private sector technology is so far ahead of the government’s own. “The real reason is DoD does not have a culture that would allow them in any way shape or form to manage a silicon valley operation,” said Brad Allenby, a faculty member at Arizona State University Center on the Future of War. “Someone high on coke, Skittles and slinging code is not a good candidate for basic training,” he later joked. Peter Singer, a strategist and senior fellow at the think tank New America Foundation, said the chasm between the private tech sector and the government is only widening—a trend that will have big implications for the “extraordinarily difficult” technological components of future war. […]


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[ISN] The tooth gnashing you hear is from Flash users installing a new 0day patch

http://arstechnica.com/security/2015/01/those-teeth-gnashings-you-hear-are-flash-users-installing-a-new-0day-patch/ By Dan Goodin Ars Technica Jan 26 2015 Adobe Systems is once again rolling out an emergency Flash update that patches a critical vulnerability under active attack to compromise the computers of unsuspecting users. The latest Flash versions fix a remote code-execution bug that, as Ars reported last week, recently came under attack in the Angler exploit kit. Malware purveyors and other types of online crooks use such kits to seed compromised websites with attack code. Once people visit the sites with vulnerable computers, the booby-trapped pages surreptitiously exploit the vulnerabilities and install backdoors that can be used to log keystrokes, steal passwords, and install new pieces of malware at will. An advisory Adobe published late last week warned that the bug resides in versions running on Windows, Macs, and Linux systems. So far, reports suggest that in-the-wild exploits are limited only to Windows systems. The vulnerability stems from a so-called use-after-free bug that allows attackers to corrupt the memory of affected computers. Trend Micro has additional technical details here. “A critical vulnerability (CVE-2015-0311) exists in Adobe Flash Player 16.0.0.287 and earlier versions for Windows and Macintosh,” the Adobe advisory stated. “Successful exploitation could cause a crash and potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system. We are aware of reports that this vulnerability is being actively exploited in the wild via drive-by-download attacks against systems running Internet Explorer and Firefox on Windows 8.1 and below.” […]


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[ISN] New Technology Detects Cyberattacks By Their Power Consumption

http://www.darkreading.com/analytics/security-monitoring/new-technology-detects-cyberattacks-by-their-power-consumption-/d/d-id/1318669 By Kelly Jackson Higgins Dark Reading 1/20/2015 Startup’s “power fingerprinting” approach catches Stuxnet infection within seconds in DOE power grid test bed. A security startup launching early next week uses trends in power consumption activity, rather than standard malware detection, to spot cyberattacks against power and manufacturing plants. The technology successfully spotted Stuxnet in an experimental network before the malware went into action. PFP Cybersecurity, which officially launches on Monday and was originally funded by DARPA, the Defense Department, and the Department of Homeland Security, basically establishes the baseline power consumption of ICS/SCADA equipment such as programmable logic controllers (PLCs), supervisory relays, or other devices and issues an alert when power consumption or RF radiation changes outside of their baseline usage occur. Such changes could be due to malware, as well as to hardware or system failures, for instance. The US Department of Energy’s Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently tested the PFP technology’s ability to detect Stuxnet on a Siemens SIMATIC S7-1200 PLC. Joe Cordaro, advisory engineer with SRNL, says the PFP system right away found Stuxnet on the PLC, before the infamous malware began to activate


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[ISN] Spike in Malware Attacks on Aging ATMs

http://krebsonsecurity.com/2014/10/spike-in-malware-attacks-on-aging-atms/ By Brian Krebs Krebs on Security October 20, 2014 This author has long been fascinated with ATM skimmers, custom-made fraud devices designed to steal card data and PINs from unsuspecting users of compromised cash machines. But a recent spike in malicious software capable of infecting and jackpotting ATMs is shifting the focus away from innovative, high-tech skimming devices toward the rapidly aging ATM infrastructure in the United States and abroad. Last month, media outlets in Malaysia reported that organized crime gangs had stolen the equivalent of about USD $1 million with the help of malware they’d installed on at least 18 ATMs across the country. Several stories about the Malaysian attack mention that the ATMs involved were all made by ATM giant NCR. To learn more about how these attacks are impacting banks and the ATM makers, I reached out to Owen Wild, NCR’s global marketing director, security compliance solutions. Wild said ATM malware is here to stay and is on the rise. BK: I have to say that if I’m a thief, injecting malware to jackpot an ATM is pretty money. What do you make of reports that these ATM malware thieves in Malaysia were all knocking over NCR machines? OW: The trend toward these new forms of software-based attacks is occurring industry-wide. It’s occurring on ATMs from every manufacturer, multiple model lines, and is not something that is endemic to NCR systems. In this particular situation for the [Malaysian] customer that was impacted, it happened to be an attack on a Persona series of NCR ATMs. These are older models. We introduced a new product line for new orders seven years ago, so the newest Persona is seven years old. […]


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[ISN] FBI Warns of Hacks by Moonlighting Foreign Agents

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-10-21/fbi-warns-of-hacks-by-moonlighting-foreign-agents.html By Chris Strohm Bloomberg.com Oct 20, 2014 The FBI is probing whether foreign government agents raided the data banks of JPMorgan Chase & Co. (JPM) while moonlighting as criminals, a bureau official said. The agents-turned-criminals who attacked JPMorgan and 13 other financial companies may have been operating with the knowledge and consent of their government, said Joseph Demarest, assistant director of the FBI’s cyber division. The Federal Bureau of Investigation has seen a trend in which agents of foreign governments work with criminals to carry out hacking attacks for financial gain, Demarest said. He didn’t identify the foreign governments suspected of being involved. “There’s a blending,” Demarest told reporters at a news conference yesterday in Washington. “They may be working as criminals by evening or dark of night and then during the day they’re working on behalf of some government.” […]


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[ISN] Researcher creates proof-of-concept worm for network-attached storage devices

http://news.techworld.com/security/3581701/researcher-creates-proof-of-concept-worm-for-network-attached-storage-devices/ By Lucian Constantin Techworld.com 20 October 2014 Network-attached storage (NAS) devices are riddled with vulnerabilities that can put the security of sensitive data and networks at risk, a researcher has found. To prove his point, he has created a proof-of-concept worm that can infect devices from three different manufacturers. Earlier this year, Jacob Holcomb, a security analyst at Baltimore-based firm Independent Security Evaluators, started researching the security of NAS devices. He selected popular devices from 10 manufacturers and found that they were all were susceptible to root compromise. In addition, he found that exploiting half of them did not require authentication. The tested devices were: Asustor AS-602T, TRENDnet TN-200 and TN-200T1, QNAP TS-870, Seagate BlackArmor 1BW5A3-570, Netgear ReadyNAS104, D-LINK DNS-345, Lenovo IX4-300D, Buffalo TeraStation 5600, Western Digital MyCloud EX4 and ZyXEL NSA325 v2. During a presentation last week at the Black Hat Europe security conference in Amsterdam, Holcomb demonstrated a proof-of-concept worm that can automatically infect the D-LINK DNS-345, TRENDnet TN-200/TN-200T1 and Western Digital MyCloud EX4 devices by exploiting command injection and authentication bypass vulnerabilities, which as far as he knows, are still unpatched. […]


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