Tag Archives: systems

My latest Gartner research: Market Opportunity Map: Security and Risk Management Software, Worldwide

20 April 2017  |  The security software market is transforming through four vectors: analytics, adoption of SaaS and managed services, expanded ecosystems, and regulations. Technology business unit leaders must realign their product and go-to-market strategies to address these key forces….

Gartner clients can access this research by clicking here.




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My latest Gartner research: Best Practices for Detecting and Mitigating Advanced Persistent Threats

Information security practitioners must implement specific strategic and tactical best practices to detect and mitigate advanced persistent threats and targeted malware by leveraging both existing and emerging security technologies in their security architectures. Management silos between network, edge, endpoint and data security systems can restrict an organization’s ability to prevent, detect and respond to advanced attacks. Adversaries continue to use social engineering and social networks to target sensitive roles or individuals within …

Gartner clients can access this research by clicking here.


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[ISN] Point-of-Sale Vendor NEXTEP Probes Breach

http://krebsonsecurity.com/2015/03/point-of-sale-vendor-nextep-probes-breach/ By Brian Krebs Krebs on Security March 9, 2015 NEXTEP Systems, a Troy, Mich.-based vendor of point-of-sale solutions for restaurants, corporate cafeterias, casinos, airports and other food service venues, was recently notified by law enforcement that some of its customer locations have been compromised in a potentially wide-ranging credit card breach, KrebsOnSecurity has learned. The acknowledgement came in response to reports by sources in the financial industry who spotted a pattern of fraud on credit cards all recently used at one of NEXTEP’S biggest customers: Zoup, a chain of some 75 soup eateries spread across the northern half of the United States and Canada. Last week, KrebsOnSecurity reached out to Zoup after hearing from financial industry sources about fraud patterns indicating some sort of card compromise at many Zoup locations. Zoup CEO Eric Ersher referred calls to NEXTEP, saying that NEXTEP was recently informed of a security issue with its point-of-sale devices. Ersher said Zoup runs NEXTEP’s point-of-sale devices across its entire chain of stores. In an emailed statement, NEXTEP President Tommy Woycik confirmed Ersher’s account, but emphasized that the company does not believe all of its customers are impacted. […]


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[ISN] US watchdog: Anthem snubbed our security audits before and after enormous hack attack

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/03/05/us_watchdog_anthem_audits/ By Shaun Nichols The Register 5 Mar 2015 A year or so before American health insurer Anthem admitted it had been ruthlessly ransacked by hackers, a US federal watchdog had offered to audit the giant’s computer security – but was rebuffed. And, after miscreants looted Anthem’s servers and accessed up to 88.8 million private records, the watchdog again offered to audit the insurer’s systems, and was again turned away. “We do not know why Anthem refuses to cooperate,” government officials told The Register today. The Office of the Inspector General (OIG) for the US Office of Personnel Management (OPM) told us it wanted to audit Anthem’s information security protections back in 2013, but was snubbed by the insurer. According to the agency, Anthem participates in the US Federal Employees Health Benefits Program, which requires regular audits from the OIG, audits that Anthem allegedly thwarted. Other health insurers submit to Uncle Sam’s audits “without incident,” we’re told. […]


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[ISN] NIST outlines guidance for security of copiers, scanners

http://gcn.com/articles/2015/02/25/nist-replication-device-security.aspx By GCN Staff Feb 25, 2015 The National Institute of Standards and Technology announced its internal report 8023: Risk Management for Replication Devices is now available. The guidance covers protecting the information processed, stored or transmitted on replication devices (RDs), which are devices that copy, print or scan documents, images or objects. Because today’s RDs have the characteristics of computing devices (storage, operating systems, CPUs and networking) they are vulnerable to a number of exploits, NIST said. Among the threats to RDs are: […]


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[ISN] Three Months Later, State Department Hasn’t Rooted Out Hackers

http://www.wsj.com/articles/three-months-later-state-department-hasnt-rooted-out-hackers-1424391453 By DANNY YADRON The Wall Street Journal Feb. 19, 2015 Three months after the State Department confirmed hackers breached its unclassified email system, the government still hasn’t been able to evict them from the department’s network, according to three people familiar with the investigation. Government officials, assisted by outside contractors and the National Security Agency, have repeatedly scanned the network and taken some systems offline. But investigators still see signs of the hackers on State Department computers, the people familiar with the matter said. Each time investigators find a hacker tool and block it, these people said, the intruders tweak it slightly to attempt to sneak past defenses. It isn’t clear how much data the hackers have taken, the people said. They reaffirmed what the State Department said in November: that the hackers appear to have access only to unclassified email. Still, unclassified material can contain sensitive intelligence. The episode illustrates the two-way nature of high-technology sleuthing. For all of the U.S. government’s prowess at getting into people’s computers through the NSA and the military’s Cyber Command, the government faces challenges keeping hackers out of its own networks. The discrepancy points to a commonly cited problem with defending computers: Playing offense almost is always easier than playing defense. […]


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[ISN] Surprise! America Already Has a Manhattan Project for Developing Cyber Attacks

http://www.wired.com/2015/02/americas-cyber-espionage-project-isnt-defense-waging-war By Kevin Poulsen Threat Level Wired.com 02.18.15 “What we really need is a Manhattan Project for cybersecurity.” It’s a sentiment that swells up every few years in the wake of some huge computer intrusion—most recently the Sony and Anthem hacks. The invocation of the legendary program that spawned the atomic bomb is telling. The Manhattan Project is America’s go-to shorthand for our deep conviction that if we gather the smartest scientists together and give them billions of dollars and a sense of urgency, we can achieve what otherwise would be impossible. A Google search on “cyber Manhattan Project” brings up results from as far back as 1997—it’s second only to “electronic Pearl Harbor” in computer-themed World War II allusions. In a much-circulated post on Medium last month, futurist Marc Goodman sets out what such a project would accomplish. “This Manhattan Project would help generate the associated tools we need to protect ourselves, including more robust, secure, and privacy-enhanced operating systems,” Goodman writes. “Through its research, it would also design and produce software and hardware that were self-healing and vastly more resistant to attack and resilient to failure than anything available today.” These arguments have so far not swayed a sitting American president. Sure, President Obama mentioned cybersecurity at the State of the Union, but his proposal not only doesn’t boost security research and development, it potentially criminalizes it. At the White House’s cybersecurity summit last week, Obama told Silicon Valley bigwigs that he understood the hacking problem well—“We all know what we need to do. We have to build stronger defenses and disrupt more attacks”—but his prescription this time was a tepid executive order aimed at improving information sharing between the government and industry. Those hoping for something more Rooseveltian must have been disappointed. On Monday, we finally learned the truth of it. America already has a computer security Manhattan Project. We’ve had it since at least 2001. Like the original, it has been highly classified, spawned huge technological advances in secret, and drawn some of the best minds in the country. We didn’t recognize it before because the project is not aimed at defense, as advocates hoped. Instead, like the original, America’s cyber Manhattan Project is purely offensive. […]


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[ISN] Is this the future of cyberwarfare?

http://america.aljazeera.com/watch/shows/america-tonight/articles/2015/2/5/blackenergy-malware-cyberwarfare.html By Aaron Ernst Al Jazeera America February 5, 2015 Five years ago, the most sophisticated cyber weapon the world had ever seen ravaged Iran’s nuclear program. Allegedly developed by the U.S. and Israel, the complex virus infected the computer system that ran the centrifuges. Slight tweaks to the software caused hundreds of the centrifuges to self-destruct, setting the program back years. The malware was dubbed Stuxnet. Traditionally, foreign governments have used malware to spy and steal. But this was something entirely different. “Stuxnet, it is a weapon, it’s not ‘like’ a weapon,” says German computer security expert Ralph Langner, who was the first to identify how the virus worked. “It is a weapon because it was designed to cause physical damage.” Now, Langner worries that Stuxnet could come back to haunt the U.S. Those same vulnerabilities in Iran’s nuclear control systems that the malware exploited can be found in similar systems throughout America. […]


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