Tag Archives: respect

Politically Correct Way to say Merry Christmas (2017)

Please accept with no obligation, implied or implicit, my best wishes for an environmentally conscious, socially responsible, low-stress, non-addictive, gender-neutral celebration of the winter or in some locations summer solstice holiday, practiced within the most enjoyable traditions of the religious persuasion of your choice, or secular practices of your choice, with respect for the religious/secular persuasion and/or traditions of others, or their choice not to practice religious or secular traditions at all. I also wish you a fiscally successful, personally fulfilling and medically uncomplicated recognition of the onset of the generally accepted calendar year 2018, but not without due respect for the calendars of choice of other cultures whose contributions to society have helped make America great. Not to imply that America is necessarily greater than any other country nor the only America in the Western Hemisphere. Also, this wish is made without regard to the race, creed, color, age, physical ability, religious faith or sexual preference of the wishee.




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[ISN] ‘CSI: Cyber’ review: Hackwork

http://www.nj.com/entertainment/tv/index.ssf/2015/03/csi_cyber_review_patricia_arquette_cbs.html By Vicki Hyman NJ Advance Media for NJ.com March 04, 2015 Thank goodness Patricia Arquette just won an Oscar, because otherwise I’d really have nothing to say about “CSI: Cyber.” The newest “CSI” franchise, which debuts on CBS tonight at 10 p.m., is about the FBI’s cyber crime division, comes with all the series’ high-tech visual flourishes and stars “Boyhood” star Arquette, who, um, just won an Oscar. Yeah. Oh! This time, the Who theme song is “I Can See For Miles.” I’m not saying “CSI: Cyber” isn’t worth watching. I’m just saying there’s not a heck of a lot to say about it. (The original flavor “CSI” is still plugging away after 15 years, while the Miami and New York franchises lasted 10 and 9 seasons, respectively. The latest entry is a bit different in that there’s a lot of people peering at computer screens instead of into microscopes. […]


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Politically Correct way to say “Merry Christmas” (2015 Edition)

Please accept with no obligation, implied or implicit, my best wishes for an environmentally conscious, socially responsible, low-stress, non-addictive, gender-neutral celebration of the winter or in some locations summer solstice holiday, practiced within the most enjoyable traditions of the religious persuasion of your choice, or secular practices of your choice, with respect for the religious/secular persuasion and/or traditions of others, or their choice not to practice religious or secular traditions at all. I also wish you a fiscally successful, personally fulfilling and medically uncomplicated recognition of the onset of the generally accepted calendar year 2015, but not without due respect for the calendars of choice of other cultures whose contributions to society have helped make America great. Not to imply that America is necessarily greater than any other country nor the only America in the Western Hemisphere. Also, this wish is made without regard to the race, creed, color, age, physical ability, religious faith or sexual preference of the wishee.


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[ISN] Cloud security remains a barrier for CIOs across Europe

http://www.computerweekly.com/news/2240236318/Cloud-security-remains-a-barrier-for-CIOs-across-Europe By Cliff Saran ComputerWeekly.com 09 December 2014 Security issues are the main factor limiting the further use of cloud computing services, research from Eurostat has found. In a survey conducted by the European Commission’s Eurostat statistics service, public cloud computing was reportedly used by 24% of large enterprises and 12% of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the EU. However, the survey noted that the risk of a security breach scored highest both for large enterprises and SMEs, at 57% and 38% respectively. “Firms attach importance to the protection of their IT systems, but the issue can be seen in the wider context of resilience to possible security breaches when using the cloud,” the Eurostat report stated. […]


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[ISN] CJK network security consultation mechanism to combat cyber-terrorism matters discussed

http://www.qianhuaweb.com/content/2014-10/22/content_5280999.htm [Google translation] By Jiang Tao and Guo Junyu China news agency October 22, 2014 Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying the 22nd at a regular press conference in Beijing, said the network security affairs consultation mechanism between Japan and South Korea for the first time the meeting discussed the fight against cybercrime and cyber-terrorism, emergency response cooperation and other issues of Internet. 21, Chinese Foreign Ministry Network Coordinator Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan, Ambassador network policy, South Korean Foreign Ministry in Beijing International Security Affairs Ambassador in Japan and South Korea co-hosted the network security affairs consultation mechanism first meeting. Hua Chunying said that the tripartite exchanged their network architecture policies and related mechanisms discussed cybersecurity code of conduct for responsible national and confidence-building measures, the Conference of the International Telecommunication Union, the ASEAN Regional Forum, the BRIC countries, the SCO and other international and areas related processes, to combat cyber crime and cyber terrorism, internet emergency response cooperation and other issues, and describes the relevant international conferences will be organized by the respective situation. Hua Chunying said the tripartite tentatively agreed to hold a second meeting will be held in South Korea next year. According to reports, Japan and South Korea in 2014 to establish the mechanism aimed at enhancing mutual trust and cooperation between the three countries in the network field.


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[ISN] Senate should demand electric grid reliability and security

http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/energy-environment/211238-senate-should-demand-electric-grid-reliability-and By Thomas S. Popik and William R. Graham The Hill July 07, 2014 With a Senate vote on two nominees for commissioners of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) pending, there is unprecedented attention on this obscure regulator of interstate pipelines and electricity transmission. In 2005, Congress granted FERC additional authority to regulate electric grid reliability and security, but too often FERC has accommodated industry rather than enforce strict standards. Both FERC nominees, Cheryl LaFleur and Norman Bay, have long tenures as commissioner and director of Enforcement, respectively. Before a confirmation vote, Senators should examine FERC’s weak regulatory record and determine whether leadership and legislative fixes are necessary. Prior to the 2003 Northeast Blackout which affected 50 million people, electric grid reliability and security were unregulated. An industry trade association had set voluntary standards but compliance was spotty. After the Northeast Blackout, a special U.S.-Canada task force identified the voluntary standards system as a prime cause. In response, Congress designed a hybrid regulatory system, where a private successor to the trade association, the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC), would set mandatory standards. FERC would have authority to request, review, and approve, but not change, NERC’s standards. Nominee and Acting FERC Chair LaFleur, formerly a senior utility executive, is a supporter of the hybrid FERC-NERC regulatory system. At an April Senate hearing entitled, “Keeping the lights on


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[ISN] Another Security Breach for Obamacare

http://www.nationalreview.com/article/381640/another-security-breach-obamacare-jillian-kay-melchior By Jillian Kay Melchior National Review July 1, 2014 A Romanian attacker hacked the Vermont health exchange’s development server last December, gaining access at least 15 times and going undetected for a month, according to records obtained by National Review Online. CGI Group, the tech firm hired to build Vermont Health Connect, described the risk as “high” in a report about the attack. It also found possible evidence of sophisticated “counter-forensics activity performed by the attacker to cover his/her tracks.” The report says that no private consumer information was stored on the hacked server, and that CGI Group had “verified that no additional servers [that may store private data] communicated with any of the identified attacker IP addresses.” But Michael Gregg, the CEO of the cyber-security consulting firm Superior Solutions, says it’s possible the hacker went on to access other parts of Vermont Health Connect, covering his tracks and remaining undetected to this day. “There is potential for consumer risk,” says Gregg, who has also testified to Congress about cyber-security risks for HealthCare.gov. “Best practices were not carried out in several respects. All those point to the possibility of further or additional breaches, because they have just not shown that they have done the due diligence, and without those controls in place, it’s hard to say. The attacker could have captured passwords on additional systems and used those to create different accounts that Vermont Health Connect doesn’t know about yet.” […]


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China Indictments and China/US Relations

Although I am a proponent of global security cooperation. I do think that all countries need to cooperate and understand that in order for free trade and development across the globe, they need to participate fairly with each other in all markets. What this means is that all countries need to provide a fair working order for information flow, competitiveness and intellectual property protection for all organizations globally. It matters not which country we talk about here, we all must play fair with our intelligence programs. Intelligence gathering should be about increasing transparency between national political factions and each country’s military and not EVER used for economic advantage. I for one am for more cooperation and collaboration between Asian countries and the United States as well as Europe, but this means that Asian countries do have to play fair and by the same rules.

My take, is there needs to be an international agreement established to depict the “appropriate” uses of intelligence agencies and their intelligence gathering efforts. These rules must establish a ban on any use of intelligence gathering for intellectual property theft or economic advantage (beyond providing insight into legal and political constructs to govern fair competition). It is of course important for countries globally to monitor each other and part of the unique way that we understand and collaborate globally with every nation and I don’t propose we end our intelligence gathering efforts. I do think it is also understandable that intelligence gathering continue to include political and military planning as well as anti-terrorist goals, however commercial entity intellectual property should have mandatory protections established. Although gathering Intellectual property may be useful to nation state intelligence efforts, the most important part is that no data retrieved should be allowed to be disseminated to commercial entities in-country for economic advantage and must be codified in law.

A fair playing field with fair competition would mean that organizations globally including governments must properly license or develop their own intellectual property and not steal and duplicate the technology. Since we are now in the information age and a significant portion of trade is based on intellectual property, it is important that we properly protect and value information so that it can retain it’s value. It is important to note that even US entities must respect these same guidelines and protect the intellectual property gathered during their own intelligence gathering efforts (which I do believe to be the case).  Intellectual property can be traded legally by organizations through license or sales of  specific intellectual property. Alternatively companies globally and certainly gain economic advantage through fair competition for employees and engineers responsible for the development of technologies and patents.

Actions UN countries should take:

  • Establish international intelligence gathering and dissemination laws.
  • Ensure intellectual property rights can be enforced globally and allow efficient civil proceedings that can take place in a timely fashion.
  • Establish a cooperative structure that all participants remain committed.
  • Each country should establish laws governing their intelligence gathering efforts aligned to the international laws respecting these critical aspects to protect intellectual property and limit use of intelligence gathered to limit dissemination of intellectuwl property to commercial entities.

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