Tag Archives: president

What Will Be the Most Coveted Devices for this Holiday Season?

Thanksgiving is soon approaching and that means Black Friday deals are rolling in from all the major manufacturers. Deals that used to be exclusively available in the U.S. are now widely available in many countries in Europe, where retailers are offering competitive offers. We asked Annette Zimmermann, research vice president at Gartner to share her thoughts on what will be the most coveted devices for this holiday season.

[ISN] Point-of-Sale Vendor NEXTEP Probes Breach

http://krebsonsecurity.com/2015/03/point-of-sale-vendor-nextep-probes-breach/ By Brian Krebs Krebs on Security March 9, 2015 NEXTEP Systems, a Troy, Mich.-based vendor of point-of-sale solutions for restaurants, corporate cafeterias, casinos, airports and other food service venues, was recently notified by law enforcement that some of its customer locations have been compromised in a potentially wide-ranging credit card breach, KrebsOnSecurity has learned. The acknowledgement came in response to reports by sources in the financial industry who spotted a pattern of fraud on credit cards all recently used at one of NEXTEP’S biggest customers: Zoup, a chain of some 75 soup eateries spread across the northern half of the United States and Canada. Last week, KrebsOnSecurity reached out to Zoup after hearing from financial industry sources about fraud patterns indicating some sort of card compromise at many Zoup locations. Zoup CEO Eric Ersher referred calls to NEXTEP, saying that NEXTEP was recently informed of a security issue with its point-of-sale devices. Ersher said Zoup runs NEXTEP’s point-of-sale devices across its entire chain of stores. In an emailed statement, NEXTEP President Tommy Woycik confirmed Ersher’s account, but emphasized that the company does not believe all of its customers are impacted. […]


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[ISN] Why Clinton’s Private Email Server Was Such a Security Fail

http://www.wired.com/2015/03/clintons-email-server-vulnerable/ By ANDY GREENBERG SECURITY Wired.com 03.04.15 FOR A SECRETARY of state, running your own email server might be a clever—if controversial—way to keep your conversations hidden from journalists and their pesky Freedom of Information Act requests. But ask a few security experts, and the consensus is that it’s not a very smart way to keep those conversations hidden from hackers. On Monday, the New York Times revealed that former secretary of state and future presidential candidate Hillary Clinton used a private email account rather than her official State.gov email address while serving in the State Department. And this was no Gmail or Yahoo! Mail account: On Wednesday the AP reported that Clinton actually ran a private mail server in her home during her entire tenure leading the State Department, hosting her email at the domain Clintonemail.com. Much of the criticism of that in-house email strategy has centered on its violation of the federal government’s record-keeping and transparency rules. But as the controversy continues to swirl, the security community is focused on a different issue: the possibility that an unofficial, unprotected server held the communications of America’s top foreign affairs official for four years, leaving all of it potentially vulnerable to state-sponsored hackers. “Although the American people didn’t know about this, it’s almost certain that foreign intelligence agencies did, just as the NSA knows which Indian and Spanish officials use Gmail and Yahoo accounts,” says Chris Soghoian, the lead technologist for the American Civil Liberties Union. “She’s not the first official to use private email and not the last. But there are serious security issue associated with these kinds of services…When you build your house outside the security fence, you’re on your own, and that’s what seems to have happened here.” […]


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[ISN] Surprise! America Already Has a Manhattan Project for Developing Cyber Attacks

http://www.wired.com/2015/02/americas-cyber-espionage-project-isnt-defense-waging-war By Kevin Poulsen Threat Level Wired.com 02.18.15 “What we really need is a Manhattan Project for cybersecurity.” It’s a sentiment that swells up every few years in the wake of some huge computer intrusion—most recently the Sony and Anthem hacks. The invocation of the legendary program that spawned the atomic bomb is telling. The Manhattan Project is America’s go-to shorthand for our deep conviction that if we gather the smartest scientists together and give them billions of dollars and a sense of urgency, we can achieve what otherwise would be impossible. A Google search on “cyber Manhattan Project” brings up results from as far back as 1997—it’s second only to “electronic Pearl Harbor” in computer-themed World War II allusions. In a much-circulated post on Medium last month, futurist Marc Goodman sets out what such a project would accomplish. “This Manhattan Project would help generate the associated tools we need to protect ourselves, including more robust, secure, and privacy-enhanced operating systems,” Goodman writes. “Through its research, it would also design and produce software and hardware that were self-healing and vastly more resistant to attack and resilient to failure than anything available today.” These arguments have so far not swayed a sitting American president. Sure, President Obama mentioned cybersecurity at the State of the Union, but his proposal not only doesn’t boost security research and development, it potentially criminalizes it. At the White House’s cybersecurity summit last week, Obama told Silicon Valley bigwigs that he understood the hacking problem well—“We all know what we need to do. We have to build stronger defenses and disrupt more attacks”—but his prescription this time was a tepid executive order aimed at improving information sharing between the government and industry. Those hoping for something more Rooseveltian must have been disappointed. On Monday, we finally learned the truth of it. America already has a computer security Manhattan Project. We’ve had it since at least 2001. Like the original, it has been highly classified, spawned huge technological advances in secret, and drawn some of the best minds in the country. We didn’t recognize it before because the project is not aimed at defense, as advocates hoped. Instead, like the original, America’s cyber Manhattan Project is purely offensive. […]


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[ISN] Auto industry gears up to stop hackers

http://www.freep.com/story/money/cars/mark-phelan/2015/02/18/cyber-security-hacking-auto/23571009/ By Mark Phelan Detroit Free Press Auto Critic February 18, 2015 Cars may become tempting targets for hackers looking to wreak havoc, and the auto industry is just beginning to face the challenge of stopping them, a panel of experts said at a conference in suburban Detroit Tuesday. Current vehicles are very vulnerable. A 14-year-old kid armed with a $14 circuit board built from Radio Shack parts cracked a new car’s the security at a hack-a-thon supplier Delphi sponsored last summer, Delphi senior vice president and chief technologist Andrew Brown Jr. told a cyber-security conference sponsored by the Center for Automotive Research. Connected cars that share information with each other and have internet and wi-fi service present automakers with myriad new challenges – and vast opportunities for hackers, Frost & Sullivan research manager Praveen Narayanan said. Cars presenting a tempting target not because hackers want to mess with a single driver, but because the car will be communicating with other vehicles, the infrastructure and finance networks, Anuja Sonalker of Battelle said. […]


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[ISN] Northrop Grumman Foundation Congratulates Top 28 Teams Advancing to CyberPatriot National Finals Competition

http://www.globenewswire.com/newsarchive/noc/press/pages/news_releases.html?d=10116947 FALLS CHURCH, Va. – Jan. 26, 2015 – The Northrop Grumman Foundation, presenting sponsor for CyberPatriot VII, is proud to congratulate the top 25 high school and three middle school teams advancing to the national finals competition on March 13 in Washington, D.C. CyberPatriot, established by the Air Force Association, is the National Youth Cyber Education Program that’s inspiring students toward careers in cybersecurity and other science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines critical to our nation’s future. The program features the National Youth Cyber Defense Competition, cyber camps, and an elementary school education program. This year’s finalists represent schools and other organizations from Alabama, California, Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, Virginia, and Manitoba, Canada. Click here for a complete listing of finalists. “We are so proud of all the students who participated this year and we wish the top 28 finalists all the best as they prepare for the big showdown,” said Sandra Evers-Manly, president of the Northrop Grumman Foundation and vice president of Northrop Grumman Global Corporate Responsibility. “CyberPatriot has proven to be an innovative way to inspire young people to pursue a career in cybersecurity. It is filling the much-needed pipeline of qualified cyber talent and we couldn’t be more pleased with its success. CyberPatriot is a true example of how a hands-on, STEM initiative can make an impact by addressing a national imperative.” A record 2,175 teams, up 40 percent from the previous year, competed this year in a series of online rounds where students were given a set of virtual images that represent operating systems and were tasked with finding vulnerabilities and hardening the system while maintaining critical services. Students competed from across the U.S. and in other parts of the world to be among the top finalists that receive an all-expenses-paid trip to the CyberPatriot National Finals in Washington, D.C. “The need for cyber defenders has never been more relevant, or urgent,” said Diane Miller, director, CyberPatriot Programs, Northrop Grumman. “To address the increasingly complex threat requires diversity of education, experience, and approach to problem solving. CyberPatriot is inspiring our youth at every level and from every pocket of the country to cultivate a cyber workforce with a strong ethical foundation, the requisite technical skills and life skills in communications, leadership and teamwork so important to potential employers. These students are career-ready and poised to take on this national and global challenge.” In its fifth year as presenting sponsor, the Northrop Grumman Foundation and Northrop Grumman Corporation continue to devote time, talent and resources to support CyberPatriot. In addition to the foundation’s financial support, Northrop Grumman awards annual scholarship funds to the top winning teams and contributes employee volunteers and mentors. The company also provides internships to CyberPatriot competitors, as do other industry and government organizations. Northrop Grumman also partnered this year with Cyber Security Challenge UK to bring CyberPatriot to the U.K.. Known as CyberCenturion, this youth cyber defense competition will hold its finals competition on April 17 at Bletchley Park in London. The CyberPatriot VII Teams will compete face-to-face in a one-day event to defend virtual networks and mobile devices from a professional aggressor team. The National Finalists will also face-off in four additional competition components: the Digital Cyber Crime Scene Challenge from the Digital Forensic Consortium, the Cisco Networking Challenge, the Leidos Digital Forensics Challenge, and a Mobile Application Challenge hosted by AT&T. These extra challenges expose teams to new elements and skillsets of the many career opportunities available to them. As a global provider of cybersecurity solutions, Northrop Grumman is committed to grooming tomorrow’s cyber workforce and is engaged in supporting numerous cybersecurity education, training and technology initiatives. For more information on Northrop Grumman in cyber, go to www.northropgrumman.com/cyber. The Northrop Grumman Foundation supports diverse and sustainable programs for students and teachers. These programs create innovative education experiences in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. For more information please visit www.northropgrumman.com/foundation. CONTACT: Marynoele Benson Northrop Grumman Corporation 703-556-1651 marynoele.benson@ngc.com


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[ISN] Obama talks cybersecurity, but Federal IT system breaches increasing [Updated]

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2015/01/obama-talks-cybersecurity-but-federal-it-systems-breaches-increase/ By David Kravets Ars Technica Jan 20, 2015 Update: This post was updated Tuesday evening to reflect comments the president made during his State of the Union address: President Barack Obama urged Congress and the American public to embrace cyber security legislation during his State of the Union address Tuesday evening. The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, known as CISPA, was unveiled by Obama a week ago and is controversial because it allows companies to share cyber threat information with the Department of Homeland Security—data that might include their customers’ private information. “No foreign nation, no hacker, should be able to shut down our networks, steal our trade secrets, or invade the privacy of American families, especially our kids. We are making sure our government integrates intelligence to combat cyber threats, just as we have done to combat terrorism. So tonight, I urge this Congress to finally pass the legislation we need to better meet the evolving threat of cyber-attacks, combat identity theft, and protect our children’s information. That should be a bipartsan effort. If we don’t act, we’ll leave our nation and our economy vulnerable. If we do, we can continue to protect the technologies that have unleashed untold opportunities for people around the globe,” the president said without identifying his CISPA proposal and others by name. New research out earlier Tuesday from George Mason University, however, calls into question how effective Obama’s proposal would be. That’s because the federal government’s IT professionals as a whole have “a poor track record in maintaining good cybersecurity and information-sharing practices.” What’s more, the federal bureaucracy “systematically” fails to meet its own federal cybersecurity standards despite billions of dollars in funding. According to a paper by Eli Dourado, a George Mason research fellow, and Andrea Castillo, manager of the university’s Technology Policy Program: […]


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[ISN] Jimmy Kimmel Asks What Is Your Password?

http://www.infosecnews.org/jimmy-kimmel-asks-what-is-your-password/ By William Knowles @c4i Senior Editor InfoSec News January 17, 2015 President Obama just unveiled a number of proposals to crack down on hackers. It’s great that the government is working on this but we need to do a better job of protecting ourselves. So Jimmy Kimmel sent a camera out onto Hollywood Boulevard to help people by asking them to tell us their password. It’s too bad there’s no legislation planned for poor password choice. […]


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