Tag Archives: industry

Gartner Says By 2020, Artificial Intelligence Will Create More Jobs Than It Eliminates

2020 will be a pivotal year in AI-related employment dynamics, according to Gartner, Inc., as artificial intelligence (AI) will become a positive job motivator. The number of jobs affected by AI will vary by industry; through 2019, healthcare, the public sector and education will see continuously growing job demand while manufacturing will be hit the hardest. Starting in 2020, AI-related job creation will cross into positive territory, reaching two million net-new jobs in 2025.

Gartner Announces Winners of the 2017 EMEA Gartner Eye on Innovation Awards

Gartner, Inc. has announced the winners of the 2017 Gartner Eye on Innovation Awards for financial services in Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA). The awards recognize innovative use of technology-enabled capabilities to highlight "best in class" financial industry initiatives launched within the past 12 months, and to offer insight into developments in digital innovation.

Gartner Announces Asia Pacific Winners of the 2017 Gartner Financial Services Eye on Innovation Awards

Gartner, Inc. has announced the winners of the 2017 Gartner Financial Services Eye on Innovation Awards for the Asia Pacific region. The awards recognize innovative use of technology-enabled capabilities to highlight "best-in-class" financial industry initiatives launched within the past 12 months and to offer insight as to developments in digital innovation.

[ISN] Point-of-Sale Vendor NEXTEP Probes Breach

http://krebsonsecurity.com/2015/03/point-of-sale-vendor-nextep-probes-breach/ By Brian Krebs Krebs on Security March 9, 2015 NEXTEP Systems, a Troy, Mich.-based vendor of point-of-sale solutions for restaurants, corporate cafeterias, casinos, airports and other food service venues, was recently notified by law enforcement that some of its customer locations have been compromised in a potentially wide-ranging credit card breach, KrebsOnSecurity has learned. The acknowledgement came in response to reports by sources in the financial industry who spotted a pattern of fraud on credit cards all recently used at one of NEXTEP’S biggest customers: Zoup, a chain of some 75 soup eateries spread across the northern half of the United States and Canada. Last week, KrebsOnSecurity reached out to Zoup after hearing from financial industry sources about fraud patterns indicating some sort of card compromise at many Zoup locations. Zoup CEO Eric Ersher referred calls to NEXTEP, saying that NEXTEP was recently informed of a security issue with its point-of-sale devices. Ersher said Zoup runs NEXTEP’s point-of-sale devices across its entire chain of stores. In an emailed statement, NEXTEP President Tommy Woycik confirmed Ersher’s account, but emphasized that the company does not believe all of its customers are impacted. […]


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[ISN] Credit Card Breach at Mandarin Oriental

http://krebsonsecurity.com/2015/03/credit-card-breach-at-mandarian-oriental/ By Brian Krebs Krebs on Security March 4, 2015 In response to questions from KrebsOnSecurity, upscale hotel chain Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group today confirmed that its hotels have been affected by a credit card breach. Reached for comment about reports from financial industry sources about a pattern of fraudulent charges on customer cards that had all recently been used at Mandarin hotels, the company confirmed it is investigating a breach. “We can confirm that Mandarin Oriental has been alerted to a potential credit card breach and is currently conducting a thorough investigation to identify and resolve the issue,” the company said in an emailed statement. “Unfortunately incidents of this nature are increasingly becoming an industry-wide concern. The Group takes the protection of customer information very seriously and is coordinating with credit card agencies and the necessary forensic specialists to ensure our guests are protected.” Mandarin isn’t saying yet how many of the company’s two-dozen or so locations worldwide may be impacted, but banking industry sources say the breach almost certainly impacted most if not all Mandarin hotels in the United States, including locations in Boston, Florida, Las Vegas, Miami, New York, and Washington, D.C. Sources also say the compromise likely dates back to just before Christmas 2014. […]


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[ISN] NSA staffers rake in Silicon Valley cash

http://thehill.com/policy/cybersecurity/233740-nsa-staffers-rake-in-silicon-valley-cash By Cory Bennett The Hill 02/24/15 Former employees of the National Security Agency are becoming a hot commodity in Silicon Valley amid the tech industry’s battle against government surveillance. Investors looking to ride the boom in cybersecurity are dangling big paydays in front of former NSA staffers, seeking to secure access to the insider knowledge they gained while working for the world’s most elite surveillance agency. With companies desperate to protect their networks against hackers, many tech executives say the best way to develop security products is to enlist the talents of people who have years of experience cracking through them. “The stories he could tell,” venture capitalist Ray Rothrock recalled about his meetings with a former NSA employee who founded the start-up Area 1 Security. “They come with a perspective that nobody in Silicon Valley has.” […]


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[ISN] Surprise! America Already Has a Manhattan Project for Developing Cyber Attacks

http://www.wired.com/2015/02/americas-cyber-espionage-project-isnt-defense-waging-war By Kevin Poulsen Threat Level Wired.com 02.18.15 “What we really need is a Manhattan Project for cybersecurity.” It’s a sentiment that swells up every few years in the wake of some huge computer intrusion—most recently the Sony and Anthem hacks. The invocation of the legendary program that spawned the atomic bomb is telling. The Manhattan Project is America’s go-to shorthand for our deep conviction that if we gather the smartest scientists together and give them billions of dollars and a sense of urgency, we can achieve what otherwise would be impossible. A Google search on “cyber Manhattan Project” brings up results from as far back as 1997—it’s second only to “electronic Pearl Harbor” in computer-themed World War II allusions. In a much-circulated post on Medium last month, futurist Marc Goodman sets out what such a project would accomplish. “This Manhattan Project would help generate the associated tools we need to protect ourselves, including more robust, secure, and privacy-enhanced operating systems,” Goodman writes. “Through its research, it would also design and produce software and hardware that were self-healing and vastly more resistant to attack and resilient to failure than anything available today.” These arguments have so far not swayed a sitting American president. Sure, President Obama mentioned cybersecurity at the State of the Union, but his proposal not only doesn’t boost security research and development, it potentially criminalizes it. At the White House’s cybersecurity summit last week, Obama told Silicon Valley bigwigs that he understood the hacking problem well—“We all know what we need to do. We have to build stronger defenses and disrupt more attacks”—but his prescription this time was a tepid executive order aimed at improving information sharing between the government and industry. Those hoping for something more Rooseveltian must have been disappointed. On Monday, we finally learned the truth of it. America already has a computer security Manhattan Project. We’ve had it since at least 2001. Like the original, it has been highly classified, spawned huge technological advances in secret, and drawn some of the best minds in the country. We didn’t recognize it before because the project is not aimed at defense, as advocates hoped. Instead, like the original, America’s cyber Manhattan Project is purely offensive. […]


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[ISN] Auto industry gears up to stop hackers

http://www.freep.com/story/money/cars/mark-phelan/2015/02/18/cyber-security-hacking-auto/23571009/ By Mark Phelan Detroit Free Press Auto Critic February 18, 2015 Cars may become tempting targets for hackers looking to wreak havoc, and the auto industry is just beginning to face the challenge of stopping them, a panel of experts said at a conference in suburban Detroit Tuesday. Current vehicles are very vulnerable. A 14-year-old kid armed with a $14 circuit board built from Radio Shack parts cracked a new car’s the security at a hack-a-thon supplier Delphi sponsored last summer, Delphi senior vice president and chief technologist Andrew Brown Jr. told a cyber-security conference sponsored by the Center for Automotive Research. Connected cars that share information with each other and have internet and wi-fi service present automakers with myriad new challenges – and vast opportunities for hackers, Frost & Sullivan research manager Praveen Narayanan said. Cars presenting a tempting target not because hackers want to mess with a single driver, but because the car will be communicating with other vehicles, the infrastructure and finance networks, Anuja Sonalker of Battelle said. […]


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