Tag Archives: different

Gartner Says I&O Skills Gaps Will Cause 75 Percent of Organizations to Experience Visible Business Disruptions by 2020

Two-thirds of organizations are not adequately addressing the infrastructure and operations (I&O) skills gaps that will impede their digital business initiatives, according to Gartner, Inc. Successful I&O organizations will need to implement vastly different roles and technologies during the next five years.

Gartner Provides Seven Steps Security Leaders Can Take to Deal With Spectre and Meltdown

Security and risk management leaders must take a pragmatic and risk-based approach to the ongoing threats posed by an entirely new class of vulnerabilities, according to Gartner, Inc. "Spectre" and "Meltdown" are the code names given to different strains of a new class of attacks that target an underlying exploitable design implementation inside the majority of computer chips manufactured over the last 20 years.

Gartner Survey Finds 59 Percent of Higher Education CIOs Expect Significant Business Model Change Due to Digital Transformation

Higher education CIOs recognize that key organizational priorities are enrollment and student success, but fail to show innovation with regard to the top technologies required to differentiate themselves and win, according to a survey from Gartner, Inc. Yet, a majority of respondents (59 percent) think there will be significant business model change due to digital transformation.

[ISN] Why Clinton’s Private Email Server Was Such a Security Fail

http://www.wired.com/2015/03/clintons-email-server-vulnerable/ By ANDY GREENBERG SECURITY Wired.com 03.04.15 FOR A SECRETARY of state, running your own email server might be a clever—if controversial—way to keep your conversations hidden from journalists and their pesky Freedom of Information Act requests. But ask a few security experts, and the consensus is that it’s not a very smart way to keep those conversations hidden from hackers. On Monday, the New York Times revealed that former secretary of state and future presidential candidate Hillary Clinton used a private email account rather than her official State.gov email address while serving in the State Department. And this was no Gmail or Yahoo! Mail account: On Wednesday the AP reported that Clinton actually ran a private mail server in her home during her entire tenure leading the State Department, hosting her email at the domain Clintonemail.com. Much of the criticism of that in-house email strategy has centered on its violation of the federal government’s record-keeping and transparency rules. But as the controversy continues to swirl, the security community is focused on a different issue: the possibility that an unofficial, unprotected server held the communications of America’s top foreign affairs official for four years, leaving all of it potentially vulnerable to state-sponsored hackers. “Although the American people didn’t know about this, it’s almost certain that foreign intelligence agencies did, just as the NSA knows which Indian and Spanish officials use Gmail and Yahoo accounts,” says Chris Soghoian, the lead technologist for the American Civil Liberties Union. “She’s not the first official to use private email and not the last. But there are serious security issue associated with these kinds of services…When you build your house outside the security fence, you’re on your own, and that’s what seems to have happened here.” […]


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[ISN] ‘CSI: Cyber’ review: Hackwork

http://www.nj.com/entertainment/tv/index.ssf/2015/03/csi_cyber_review_patricia_arquette_cbs.html By Vicki Hyman NJ Advance Media for NJ.com March 04, 2015 Thank goodness Patricia Arquette just won an Oscar, because otherwise I’d really have nothing to say about “CSI: Cyber.” The newest “CSI” franchise, which debuts on CBS tonight at 10 p.m., is about the FBI’s cyber crime division, comes with all the series’ high-tech visual flourishes and stars “Boyhood” star Arquette, who, um, just won an Oscar. Yeah. Oh! This time, the Who theme song is “I Can See For Miles.” I’m not saying “CSI: Cyber” isn’t worth watching. I’m just saying there’s not a heck of a lot to say about it. (The original flavor “CSI” is still plugging away after 15 years, while the Miami and New York franchises lasted 10 and 9 seasons, respectively. The latest entry is a bit different in that there’s a lot of people peering at computer screens instead of into microscopes. […]


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[ISN] Hacker Claims Feds Hit Him With 44 Felonies When He Refused to Be an FBI Spy

http://www.wired.com/2015/02/hacker-claims-feds-hit-44-felonies-refused-fbi-spy/ By Andy Greenberg Threat Level Wired.com 02.18.15 A year ago, the Department of Justice threatened to put Fidel Salinas in prison for the rest of his life for hacking crimes. But before the federal government brought those charges against him, Salinas now says, it tried a different tactic: recruiting him. A Southern District of Texas judge sentenced Salinas earlier this month to six months in prison and a $10,600 fine after he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count of computer fraud and abuse. The charge stemmed from his repeatedly scanning the local Hidalgo County website for vulnerabilities in early 2012. But just months before he took that plea, the 28-year-old with ties to the hacktivist group Anonymous instead faced 44 felony hacking and cyberstalking charges, all of which were later dismissed. And now that his case is over, Salinas is willing to say why he believes he faced that overwhelming list of empty charges. As he tells it, two FBI agents asked him to hack targets on the bureau’s behalf, and he refused. Over the course of a six-hour FBI interrogation in May, 2013, months after his arrest, Salinas says two agents from the FBI’s Southern District of Texas office asked him to use his skills to gather information on Mexican drug cartels and local government figures accepting bribes from drug traffickers. “They asked me to gather information on elected officials, cartel members, anyone I could get data from that would help them out,” Salinas told WIRED in a phone interview before his sentencing. “I told them no.” “Fundamentally this represents the FBI trying to recruit by indictment,” says Salinas’ lawyer Tor Ekeland, who took the case pro bono last year. “The message was clear: If he had agreed to help them, they would have dropped the charges in a second.” […]


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[ISN] Is this the future of cyberwarfare?

http://america.aljazeera.com/watch/shows/america-tonight/articles/2015/2/5/blackenergy-malware-cyberwarfare.html By Aaron Ernst Al Jazeera America February 5, 2015 Five years ago, the most sophisticated cyber weapon the world had ever seen ravaged Iran’s nuclear program. Allegedly developed by the U.S. and Israel, the complex virus infected the computer system that ran the centrifuges. Slight tweaks to the software caused hundreds of the centrifuges to self-destruct, setting the program back years. The malware was dubbed Stuxnet. Traditionally, foreign governments have used malware to spy and steal. But this was something entirely different. “Stuxnet, it is a weapon, it’s not ‘like’ a weapon,” says German computer security expert Ralph Langner, who was the first to identify how the virus worked. “It is a weapon because it was designed to cause physical damage.” Now, Langner worries that Stuxnet could come back to haunt the U.S. Those same vulnerabilities in Iran’s nuclear control systems that the malware exploited can be found in similar systems throughout America. […]


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