[ISN] Nigerian bank falls victim to $40 million insider cyber-heist

http://www.finextra.com/news/fullstory.aspx?newsitemid=26446 Finextra.com 15 September 2014 Nigerian police are on the hunt for an IT staffer at Skye Bank who hacked into the bank’s systems and transferred $40 million to a raft of bogus accounts before going on the run. Thirty-eight year old Isoko resident Godswill Oyegwa Uyoyou is alleged to have conspired with a criminal gang to access the bank’s computer system and inflate the balances of various accounts. Uyoyou, who worked in the information and communication technology department of Skye Bank, allegedly provided the gang with physical access to the bank’s computer servers under the pretext of carrying out weekend maintenance. The gang were in the process of withdrawing the cash when the heist was rumbled. So far, no arrests have been made and the bank has yet to issue any statement as to how much cash was lost to the fraud. […]




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[ISN] Hacker exploits printer Web interface to install, run Doom

http://arstechnica.com/security/2014/09/hacker-exploits-printer-web-interface-to-install-run-doom/ By Sam Machkovech Ars Technica Sept 15 2014 On Friday, a hacker presenting at the 44CON Information Security Conference in London picked at the vulnerability of Web-accessible devices and demonstrated how to run unsigned code on a Canon printer via its default Web interface. After describing the device’s encryption as “doomed,” Context Information Security consultant Michael Jordon made his point by installing and running the first-person shooting classic Doom on a stock Canon Pixma MG6450. Sure enough, the printer’s tiny menu screen can render a choppy and discolored but playable version of id Software’s 1993 hit, the result of Jordon discovering that Pixma printers’ Web interfaces didn’t require any authentication to access. “You could print out hundreds of test pages and use up all the ink and paper, so what?” Jordon wrote at Context’s blog report about the discovery, but after a little more sniffing, he found that the devices could also easily be redirected to accept any code as legitimate firmware. A vulnerable Pixma printer’s Web interface allows users to change the Web proxy settings and the DNS server. From there, an enterprising hacker can crack the device’s encryption in eight steps, the final of which includes unsigned, plain-text firmware files. The hacking possibilities go far beyond enabling choppy, early ’90s gaming: “We can therefore create our own custom firmware and update anyone’s printer with a Trojan image which spies on the documents being printed or is used as a gateway into their network,” Jordon wrote. […]


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[ISN] Amazon fixes security flaw in Kindle ebooks

http://www.itpro.co.uk/security/23124/amazon-fixes-security-flaw-in-kindle-ebooks By Clare Hopping IT Pro 17 Sep, 2014 Amazon has responded to complaints about malware present on Kindle ebooks by fixing the security flaw. Yesterday, it was revealed that some ebooks downloaded from the internet were installing malware on the ereader, meaning hackers could potentially gain access to users’ Amazon accounts or personal details for identity fraud purposes. Security researcher Benjamin Daniel Mussler uncovered the flaw and said Amazon was very much open to a cross-site scripting attack. The issue is not thought to affect people who buy their books from Amazon, but could arise if they use an illegal download or untrustworthy ebook site. […]


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[ISN] Hackers had access to Goodwill hosting provider for 18 months

http://www.computerworld.com/article/2684180/hackers-had-access-to-goodwill-hosting-provider-for-18-months.html By Jeremy Kirk IDG News Service Sep 16, 2014 Hackers evaded security systems for a year-and-a-half at a hosting center that processed payment cards for Goodwill Industries, using the same type of malware that struck Target and other major retailers to steal card data, according to the charity’s software vendor. In its first public statement since being identified by Goodwill as its technology partner, C&K Systems of Murrells Inlet, S.C., said two other customers were also affected by the unauthorized access, though it didn’t name them. Goodwill, which sells donated clothing, said in July that federal authorities were investigating a possible payment card breach at its U.S. outlets. It’s one of many retailers, including Target, Neiman Marcus, Michaels, P.F. Chang’s China Bistro and Sally Beauty, that have disclosed data breaches since December. In a rare move, Goodwill identified C&K as one of the contractors that provided payment processing for 20 of its stores, and said those stores had since stopped using the company’s services. […]


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[ISN] JP Morgan denies that system blueprints were stolen in June cyber attack

http://www.computing.co.uk/ctg/news/2369726/jp-morgan-denies-that-system-blueprints-were-stolen-in-june-cyber-attack By Graeme Burton Computing.co.uk 16 Sep 2014 More details have emerged about the attack on banking giant JP Morgan, which saw sensitive banking systems hacked and details about clients and deals apparently transmitted to systems in Russia. The breach occurred in June, but has only recently been disclosed. According to the latest disclosures, the hackers were able to access information about one million customer accounts and also obtained a list of the software applications installed on the bank’s computers. More than 90 of the bank’s servers were affected, and the attackers gained high-level administrative privileges in the systems that they cracked. JP Morgan also claims that its charity website, JP Morgan Corporate Challenge, was attacked with hackers getting login credentials and passwords. However, the bank says that it doesn’t know whether the two attacks are related. Dr Mike Lloyd, chief technology officer at security analytics company RedSeal Networks, suggested that the information accessed by the attackers indicated that they will almost be certainly back again. […]


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[ISN] How Main Street Will Pay for Home Depot’s Data Breach

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-09-16/home-depot-breach-why-small-merchants-will-pay By Patrick Clark Businessweek.com September 16, 2014 Federal law protects consumers from the cost of fraudulent charges incurred when thieves steal credit-card and debit-card numbers. That’s good for the millions of Americans who had their payments data exposed by the hackers who breached Home Depot’s (HD) computer system earlier this year. And it’s bad for merchants, who often take losses on sales made to crooks with stolen cards. When a credit-card company identifies fraud, it wipes the payment off the cardholder’s account and notifies the merchant. Unless the store can prove the payment was authorized, the credit-card company debits money from a merchant’s checking account, leaving the vendor on the hook for the cost of items that were fraudulently purchased. Merchants also pay penalties, called chargeback fees, for accepting unauthorized charges. Accrue too many chargebacks and you’ll pay higher processing fees or lose the ability to accept certain credit cards. Those costs add up. The average merchant lost .68 percent of annual revenue to fraud in 2013, but the total cost is a multiple of that, according to a survey published (PDF) last month by LexisNexis. For every dollar lost to fraud, merchants spend a further $3.08, to replace lost inventory and cover chargeback fees and other penalties, according to the survey. The Home Depot hack left as many as 60 million credit cards and debit cards exposed, according to a report in the New York Times. Add those to the 40 million accounts affected by a hacker assault on Target (TGT) last year, plus the cards pilfered from Chinese restaurant chain P.F. Chang, luxury retailer Neiman Marcus, and others. A lot of stolen identities are floating around. […]


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