[ISN] Lawmakers Want Pentagon to Clarify Cloud Security Standards

http://www.nextgov.com/cloud-computing/2014/04/lawmakers-want-pentagon-clarify-cloud-security-standards/83245/ By William Matthews Nextgov.com April 25, 2014 Two House members are proposing legislation they say would ease the way for cloud computing vendors to sell services to the Defense Department. The Defense Cloud Security Act would require department officials to set clearer security requirements for cloud storage and other cloud services “and give vendors an opportunity to meet those standards,” said an aide to Rep. Niki Tsongas, D-Mass. Tsongas and Rep. Derek Kilmer, D-Wash., are expected to introduce the legislation April 28. Although the Defense Department already buys cloud services from a number of private vendors, Tsongas and Kilmer say that more companies could be providing more cloud services if the military had clearer security requirements. For vendors, the military represents a large and potentially lucrative market for cloud storage and applications. And for the Defense Department, the cloud represents a way to reduce the cost of owning and operating its own servers and software. […]




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[ISN] Red tape, ‘tattoo-aversion’ snarls government hiring of cybersecurity experts

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/sns-rt-us-usa-cybersecurity-dhs-20140426,0,136919.story By Doina Chiacu Reuters April 26, 2014 In the race to attract cybersecurity experts to protect the government’s computer networks, the Department of Homeland Security has a handicap money can’t fix. Navigating the federal hiring system takes many months, which is too long in the fast-paced tech world. “Even when somebody is patriotic and wants to do their duty for the nation, if they’re really good they’re not going to wait six months to get hired,” said Mark Weatherford, the former cyber chief at DHS. After a spate of national security leaks and with cybercrime on the rise, the department is vying with the private sector and other three-letter federal agencies to hire and retain talent to secure federal networks and contain threats to American businesses and utilities. […]


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[ISN] Secret Shin Bet Unit at The Front Lines of Israel’s Cyber-War

http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/179925 By Tova Dvorin Arutz Sheva 4/25/2014 Several weeks ago, a vigilante by the name of “Buddhax” made waves when he exposed the true faces – and names and passwords – of several anti-Israel hackers who participated in the #OpIsrael project to launch a cyber-attack against Israel. Now, nearly one month later, Channel 2 revealed Friday the existence of another party responsible for keeping Israel’s cyberspace safe: a secret unit of the Israeli Security Agency (ISA), or Shin Bet. Tens of hackers work in S-74, the codename for the Shin Bet unit which protects Israeli cyberspace. For days, they will cluster around their computers, tracking the suspicious movements of “Anonymous” hacktivists around the world. Then, just moments before a hack will disrupt a system, they will strike – without anyone even knowing the Shin Bet was involved. “We have prepared well in advance, we follow networks around the world closely and collect intelligence through HUMINT and SIGINT [human intelligence and signals intelligence, respectively – ed.],” Alon, an S-74 member, revealed to the daily Friday. […]


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[ISN] It’s Insanely Easy to Hack Hospital Equipment

http://www.wired.com/2014/04/hospital-equipment-vulnerable/ By Kim Zetter Threat Level Wired.com 04.25.14 When Scott Erven was given free rein to roam through all of the medical equipment used at a large chain of Midwest health care facilities, he knew he would find security problems–but he wasn’t prepared for just how bad it would be. In a study spanning two years, Erven and his team found drug infusion pumps–for delivering morphine drips, chemotherapy and antibiotics–that can be remotely manipulated to change the dosage doled out to patients; Bluetooth-enabled defibrillators that can be manipulated to deliver random shocks to a patient’s heart or prevent a medically needed shock from occurring; X-rays that can be accessed by outsiders lurking on a hospital’s network; temperature settings on refrigerators storing blood and drugs that can be reset, causing spoilage; and digital medical records that can be altered to cause physicians to misdiagnose, prescribe the wrong drugs or administer unwarranted care. Erven’s team also found that, in some cases, they could blue-screen devices and restart or reboot them to wipe out the configuration settings, allowing an attacker to take critical equipment down during emergencies or crash all of the testing equipment in a lab and reset the configuration to factory settings. “Many hospitals are unaware of the high risk associated with these devices,” Erven says. “Even though research has been done to show the risks, health care organizations haven’t taken notice. They aren’t doing the testing they need to do and need to focus on assessing their risks.” […]


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[ISN] TDL4 rootkit can be modified to pwn any security product, Bromium researchers discover

http://news.techworld.com/security/3513668/tdl4-rootkit-can-be-modified-pwn-any-security-product-bromium-researchers-discover/ By John E Dunn Techworld 28 April 2014 Kernel mode rootkits are more viable than has been realised and could be used to bypass more or less any security product in existence, researchers at Bromium have discovered after conducting a proof-of-concept attack using a modified variant of in the infamous TDL4 malware. Due to be presented in more detail by the firm at this week’s Security BSides event in London, the research involved ‘tweaking’ the TDL4 variant that had appeared to take advantage of the Windows kernel privilege zero day (CVE-2013-3660), discovered in June last year. With a new payload, what this created was something lethal enough to overcome a variety of security layers the team tested against it such as antivirus, sandboxes and intrusion prevention, making it a sort of “Swiss Army knife” attack hiding behind ring zero. “While many were aware of the discovery of the TDL4 rootkit rumoured to be using kernel exploit code at the end of last year, few paid it any serious attention. And that was a huge error of judgement,” said Bromium’s head of security, Rahul Kashyap. […]


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