[ISN] Air Force and Army Disclose Budget for Hacking Operations

http://www.nextgov.com/cybersecurity/2013/04/air-force-and-army-disclose-budget-hacking-operations/62664/ By Aliya Sternstein NextGov.com April 19, 2013 The Pentagon has for the first time detailed $30 million in spending on Air Force cyberattack operations and significant new Army funding and staff needs for exploiting opponent computers. Since 2011, top military brass have acknowledged the United States has the capability to hack back if threatened by adversaries in cyberspace. Now, the Defense Department is providing lawmakers and taxpayers with evidence of network assault programs to sustain funding, budget analysts say. The Air Force in fiscal 2014 expects to spend $19.7 million on “offensive cyber operations,” including research and development, operations, and training, according to budget documents circulated this week. The service estimates needing $9.8 million for new tools to run those offensive cyber operations, including memory storage, local and long-haul communications, and “unique intelligence and analysis equipment,” a spending justification stated. […] ______________________________________________ Visit the InfoSec News Security Bookstore Best Selling Security Books and More! http://www.shopinfosecnews.org




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[ISN] Azerbaijani ministry denies fact of stealing its confidential information

http://en.trend.az/regions/scaucasus/azerbaijan/2141576.html Trend.az 21 April 2013 The information spread at the websites about alleged stealing of the Azerbaijani Communications and IT Ministry’s confidential information is wrong. The primary data investigation of the incident revealed that the letters and documents made public, are fakes and are biased. Earlier, representatives of Anonymous hacker group spread the information in Twitter that they were able to steal about 1.5 gigabytes of various information belonging to the ministry. In response, the ministry sent the statement to all organizations and ministries of several countries indicated in the documents placed by hackers. The received responses confirm that the documents are fakes and wrong. […] ______________________________________________ Visit the InfoSec News Security Bookstore Best Selling Security Books and More! http://www.shopinfosecnews.org


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[ISN] Hackers send bogus tweets from ’60 Minutes’ account

http://news.cnet.com/8301-1009_3-57580604-83/hackers-send-bogus-tweets-from-60-minutes-account/ By Edward Moyer Security & Privacy CNET News April 20, 2013 The Twitter accounts for CBS News programs “60 Minutes” and “48 Hours” were used by hackers earlier today to send out messages accusing the U.S. of aiding terrorists, the network confirmed. “We have experienced problems on Twitter accounts of #60Minutes & @48Hours; We apologize for the inconvenience; Twitter is resolving issues,” read a tweet from @CBSNews. Read another from @60Minutes: “PLEASE NOTE: Our Twitter account was compromised earlier today. We are working with Twitter to resolve.” Bogus messages tweeted from the hacked accounts included this one from the @60Minutes account: Exclusive: Terror is striking the #USA and #Obama is Shamelessly in Bed with Al-Qaeda. […] ______________________________________________ Visit the InfoSec News Security Bookstore Best Selling Security Books and More! http://www.shopinfosecnews.org


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[ISN] Air Force hackers win NSA’s 13th annual Cyber Defense Exercise

https://www.networkworld.com/community/node/82902 By Ms. Smith NetworkWorld.com 04/21/13 Did you hear about the big game last week? Perhaps not, since as “this annual battle might not yet have achieved the same mythic status as, say, the Army-Navy football game,” but there was a simulated cyberwar being waged from April 16 – 18. During the NSA’s 13th annual Cyber Defense Exercise (CDX), sponsored by the NSA’s Information Assurance Directorate (IAD), “nearly 60 government experts – sitting under a black skull and crossbones flag – worked around the clock this week to break into computer networks built by students at the Air Force, Army, Navy, Coast Guard and Merchant Marine academies.” Two military graduate schools, the Naval Postgraduate School and the Royal Military College of Canada, also participated. According to the NSA press release, “The U.S. Air Force Academy won this year’s Cyber Defense Exercise (CDX), gaining its fourth trophy – and its first consecutive victory – since the annual competition began in 2001.” “If you were a boxer, and you never stepped into the ring before and Mohamed Ali or Mike Tyson gave you a couple of pops, it would be difficult for you to defend yourself had you never had any practice,” Bill Stackpole told CSO; he is an associate professor who teaches network security at the Rochester Institute of Technology. “These competitions give you practice on the receiving end.” The NSA was the red team, “pretending to be the bad guys,” stated Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition Director Dwayne Williams. “Their job was to break into each of the military academy’s teams’ network, steal information from them, shut down their services, degrade their capabilities — that sort of thing.” Due to time constraints of this simulated cyberwar, NSA hackers were a bit “louder” than if this were nation state or other bad actor hackers trying to covertly break into infrastructure. Yet “the attack tools are the same — probe the network, scan the network, break into the network, put in backdoors, steal information, set up dummy accounts and disrupt capabilities.” […] ______________________________________________ Visit the InfoSec News Security Bookstore Best Selling Security Books and More! http://www.shopinfosecnews.org


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[ISN] Japanese Feds urge ISPs to support Tor ban plan

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/04/22/tor_japan_police_ban/ By Phil Muncaster The Register 22nd April 2013 Japan’s technology-illiterate police have put themselves in the firing line once again after recommending what amounts to a blanket ban on the use of the Tor anonymiser network in the country. The FBI-like National Police Agency is set to request ISPs to voluntarily block communications if the customer is found to have “abused” the service online, according to The Mainichi. Given that there’s no way of actually checking what Tor is being used for in a particular instance, as it anonymises traffic, the implication is that if someone is using it they must be up to no good. The recommendations were made at the end of last week by an NPA panel set up to work out how best to tackle cyber crimes using Tor. […] ______________________________________________ Visit the InfoSec News Security Bookstore Best Selling Security Books and More! http://www.shopinfosecnews.org


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