[ISN] Ransom, implant attack highlight need for healthcare security

http://www.csoonline.com/article/725880/ransom-implant-attack-highlight-need-for-healthcare-security By Taylor Armerding CSO January 08, 2013 All healthcare data breaches are not equal. They’re all bad, and reaching epidemic levels. The security testing company Redspin, for one, found that Protected Health Information (PHI) breaches nearly doubled from 2010 to 2011. The Department of Health and Human Services has reported 525 breaches of 500 or more records, involving 21.4 individuals over the past three years, said Redspin president and CEO Daniel Berger. But the raw numbers are only a piece of the story. Gienna Shaw, editor of FierceHealthIT, wrote in a post this week: “It’s not the numbers that interest me most. It’s the stories behind them,” she wrote. “And there are so many stories …” One involved the Surgeons of Lake County, a small medical practice in Libertyville, Ill. Hackers broke into the system last summer, gained access to the names, addresses, Social Security numbers, credit card numbers and some medical information on more than 7,000 patients, then encrypted all the information and demanded a ransom. Another involved medical students creating fake identities so they could post patient information on Facebook and other social media sites. A third involved malware infecting hospital equipment. […] ______________________________________________ Visit the InfoSec News Security Bookstore Best Selling Security Books and More! http://www.shopinfosecnews.org



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[ISN] Romanian Hacker Gets 21-Month Sentence for Breaching Subway

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2013/01/subway-hacking-scam/ By David Kravets Threat Level Wired.com 01.08.13 A Romanian national is being sentenced in the United States to 21 months in prison for his role in a successful plot to hack customer credit-card-processing systems at more than 150 Subway restaurants and 50 other unnamed retailers. In all, four Romanian hackers compromised the credit-card data of more than 80,000 U.S. customers and used the data to make millions of dollars in unauthorized purchases, according to a 2011 federal indictment. (.pdf) Cezar Butu was handed a nearly two-year-term Monday in a New Hampshire federal court after pleading guilty in September to his role in the scam. > From 2008 until May 2011, the four are accused of hacking into more than 200 point-of-sale (POS) systems in order to install a keystroke logger and other sniffing software that would steal customer credit, debit and gift-card numbers. The hackers also placed backdoors on the systems to provide ongoing access. The hackers allegedly scanned the internet to identify vulnerable POS systems with certain remote desktop software applications installed on them, and then used the applications to log into the targeted POS system, either by guessing the passwords or using password-cracking software. […] ______________________________________________ Visit the InfoSec News Security Bookstore Best Selling Security Books and More! http://www.shopinfosecnews.org

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[ISN] Secret footsoldier targeting banks reveals meaner, leaner face of DDoS

http://arstechnica.com/security/2013/01/secret-footsoldier-targeting-banks-reveals-meaner-leaner-face-of-ddos/ By Dan Goodin Ars Technica Jan 8 2013 Over the past two weeks, a new wave of Web attacks has battered major US banks, causing disruptions for many of their online services. Now, an Israel-based security firm has uncovered one of the secret footsoldiers behind the mass assault: a compromised website that was rigged to unleash a torrent of junk traffic on three of the world’s biggest financial institutions. The discovery by Web application security firm Incapsula helps explain the strategy behind the four-month-old campaign, which has been carried out under the flag of a group calling itself Izz ad-Din al-Qassam—rather than compromise and recruit thousands or tens of thousands of end-user PCs to carry out the distributed denial-of-service attacks, why not target a handful of Web servers that have orders of magnitude more bandwidth and processing power? Over the weekend, Incapsula researchers noticed a general-interest website located in the UK that was exhibiting suspicious behavior. They quickly discovered a backdoor that had been planted on it that was programmed to receive instructions from remote attackers. An analysis showed the website, which had just recently contracted with Incapsula, was being directed to send a flood of HTTP and UDP packets to major banks including PNC Financial Services, HSBC, and Fifth Third Bank. “Since the commands were blocked by our service the attack was mitigated even before it started, so we can’t be absolutely sure about the scope of damage this attack would cause,” Incapsula Security Analyst Ronen Atias wrote in a blog post published Tuesday. “Still, it is safe to assume that it would be enough to seriously harm an average medium-sized website.” […]
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[ISN] Hacker uses cat to deliver virus clues to Japanese police

http://news.techworld.com/security/3419296/hacker-uses-cat-deliver-virus-clues-japanese-police/ By John E Dunn Techworld 08 January 2013 The battle between a mysterious hacker and Japanese police has taken a bizarre turn with the news that the authorities have recovered a memory card containing new clues sent to them strapped to a cat. The card is reported by Japanese media as containing evidence that its sender was behind the ‘iesys.exe’ virus used by the hacker to anonymously send messages from remote PCs threatening to plant bombs in schools, including one attended by grandchildren of Japan’s Emperor Akihito. Issued over several months in 2012, the threats explain why the police issued a reward of 3 million yen (about £21,400) for information leading to the individual’s capture, but the affair has also grown into a huge embarrassment for police. In October it emerged that police has arrested and extracted confessions from four individuals whose PCs had apparently sent the threatening messages only for the real hacker to reveal that they had been hijacked using the ‘remote control virus’. […]
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[ISN] Former UNL student accused of hacking NeSIS will face trial

http://www.dailynebraskan.com/news/article_6d15f3d6-5a1a-11e2-a4d4-0019bb30f31a.html By Lis Arneson Daily Nebraskan January 9, 2013 The case against a former University of Nebraska-Lincoln student accused of hacking into the University of Nebraska’s Nebraska Student Information System on May 23 will head to trial. Daniel Stratman, 22, refused to enter a plea during his arraignment Tuesday afternoon before U.S. Magistrate Judge Cheryl Zwart. As a result, the district court entered a plea of not guilty. The U.S. Attorneys’ Office filed charges against Stratman on Dec. 6. In court documents, Assistant U.S. Attorney Steven Russell said that between April 24 and May 24, Stratman intentionally accessed a protected computer without authorization, which resulted in reckless damage. The charge claims that Stratman’s conduct caused a loss of at least $5,000. […]
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