Tag Archives: tools

My latest Gartner research:Competitive Landscape: Endpoint Detection and Response Tools

5 January 2017  |  …EPP providers starting to offer EDR features. At least 50% of endpoint detection and responseproviders will incorporate enhanced analytics of user and attacker…the next 12 to 24 months, up from less than 15% today. The endpoint detection and response (EDR…

Gartner clients can access this research by clicking here.




Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

[ISN] NSA Hacker Chief Explains How to Keep Him Out of Your System

www.wired.com/2016/01/nsa-hacker-chief-explains-how-to-keep-him-out-of-your-system/ By Kim Zetter Security Wired.com 1/28/2016 IT WAS THE talk most anticipated at this year’s inaugural Usenix Enigma security conference in San Francisco and one that even the other speakers were eager to hear. Rob Joyce, the nation’s hacker-in-chief, took up the ironic task of telling a roomful of computer security professionals and academics how to keep people like him and his elite corps out of their systems. Joyce is head of the NSA’s Tailored Access Operations—the government’s top hacking team who are responsible for breaking into the systems of its foreign adversaries, and occasionally its allies. He’s been with the NSA for more than 25 years but only became head of the TAO division in April 2013, just weeks before the first leaks from Edward Snowden were published by the Guardian and Washington Post. Joyce acknowledged that it was “very strange” for someone in his position to stand onstage before an audience. The TAO has largely existed in the shadowy recesses of the NSA—known and unknown at the same time—until only recently when documents leaked by Snowden and others exposed the workings of this cabal as well as many of its sophisticated hacking tools. […]


Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

[ISN] NSA Hacker Chief Explains How to Keep Him Out of Your System

www.wired.com/2016/01/nsa-hacker-chief-explains-how-to-keep-him-out-of-your-system/ By Kim Zetter Security Wired.com 1/28/2016 IT WAS THE talk most anticipated at this year’s inaugural Usenix Enigma security conference in San Francisco and one that even the other speakers were eager to hear. Rob Joyce, the nation’s hacker-in-chief, took up the ironic task of telling a roomful of computer security professionals and academics how to keep people like him and his elite corps out of their systems. Joyce is head of the NSA’s Tailored Access Operations—the government’s top hacking team who are responsible for breaking into the systems of its foreign adversaries, and occasionally its allies. He’s been with the NSA for more than 25 years but only became head of the TAO division in April 2013, just weeks before the first leaks from Edward Snowden were published by the Guardian and Washington Post. Joyce acknowledged that it was “very strange” for someone in his position to stand onstage before an audience. The TAO has largely existed in the shadowy recesses of the NSA—known and unknown at the same time—until only recently when documents leaked by Snowden and others exposed the workings of this cabal as well as many of its sophisticated hacking tools. […]


Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

[ISN] CarolinaCon-12 – March 2016 – FINAL ANNOUNCEMENT

Forwarded from: Vic Vandal CarolinaCon-12 will be held on March 4th-6th, 2016 in Raleigh NC. For the cheap price of $40 YOU could get a full weekend of talks, hacks, contests, and parties. Regarding the price increase to $40, it was forced due to ever-rising venue costs. But we promise to provide more value via; great talks, great side events, kickass new attendee badges, cool giveaways, etc. We’ve selected as many presentations as we can fit into the lineup. Here they are, in no particular order: – Mo Money Mo Problems: The Cashout – Benjamin Brown – Breaking Android apps for fun and profit – Bill Sempf – Gettin’ Vishy with it – Owen / Snide- @LinuxBlog – Buffer Overflows for x86, x86_64 and ARM – John F. Davis (Math 400) – Surprise! Everything can kill you. – fort – Advanced Reconnaissance Framework – Solray – Introducing PS>Attack, a portable PowerShell attack toolkit – Jared Haight – Reverse Engineer iOS apps because reasons – twinlol – FLOSS every day – automatically extracting obfuscated strings from malware – Moritz Raabe and William Ballenthin – John the Ripper sits in the next cubicle: Cracking passwords in a Corporate environment – Steve Passino – Dynamic Analysis with Windows Performance Toolkit – DeBuG (John deGruyter) – Deploying a Shadow Threat Intel Capability: Understanding YOUR Adversaries without Expensive Security Tools – grecs – AR Hacking: How to turn One Gun Into Five Guns – Deviant Ollam – Reporting for Hackers – Jon Molesa @th3mojo – Never Go Full Spectrum – Cyber Randy – I Am The Liquor – Jim Lahey CarolinaCon-12 Contests/Challenges/Events: – Capture The Flag – Crypto Challenge – Lockpicking Village – Hardware Hack-Shop – Hacker Trivia – Unofficial CC Shootout LODGING: If you’re traveling and wish to stay at the Con hotel here is the direct link to the CarolinaCon discount group rate: www.hilton.com/en/hi/groups/personalized/R/RDUNHHF-CCC-20160303/index.jhtml NOTE: The website defaults to March 3rd-6th instead of March 4th-6th and the group rate is no longer available on March 3rd. So make sure that you change the reservation dates to get the group rate. ATTENTION: The discount group rate on Hilton hotel rooms expires THIS weekend on JANUARY 31st 2016, so act quickly if you plan on staying at the hotel for all of the weekend fun and you want the group rate. CarolinaCon formal proceedings/talks will run; – 7pm to 11pm on Friday – 10am to 9pm on Saturday – 10am to 4pm on Sunday For presentation abstracts, speaker bios, the final schedule, side event information, and all the other exciting details (as they develop and as our webmaster gets to them) stay tuned to: www.carolinacon.org ADVERTISERS / VENDORS / SPONSORS: There are no advertisers, vendors, or sponsors allowed at CarolinaCon….ever. Please don’t waste your time or ours in asking. CarolinaCon has been Rated “M” for Mature. Peace, Vic


Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

[ISN] Hackers Target U.S. Intelligence Director

www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2497873,00.asp By Don Reisinger pcmag.com January 14, 2016 The so-called “teenage hackers” who last year found their way into the CIA director’s AOL email account are back at it, according to a report. A member of hacking group “Crackas with Attitude (CWA)” contacted Vice’s Motherboard to inform the publication that it hacked several accounts owned by James Clapper, U.S. director of national intelligence. According to Motherboard, hackers broke into Clapper’s FiOS account and forward all phone calls to the Free Palestine Movement. They also hacked his wife’s Yahoo account. Clapper’s office confirmed the breach to Motherboard, but declined to elaborate. CWA came on the hacking scene in a big way last year after hacking CIA Director John Brennan’s personal email account. Upon doing so, they claimed to have gained access to several tools and portals used by U.S. agencies. […]


Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

[ISN] A looming anniversary, and a special offer

www.cerias.purdue.edu/site/blog/post/a_looming_anniversary_and_a_special_offer/ [This was posted on Twitter Thursday by Gene Spafford – @TheRealSpaf and I figured I should share this with the list. Please check out the above link for complete details, history, and the special offer! – WK] Sunday, December 06, 2015 by spaf It may seem odd to consider June 2016 as January approaches, but I try to think ahead. And June 2016 is a milestone anniversary of sorts. So, I will start with some history, and then an offer to get something special and make a charitable donation at the same time. In June of 1991, the first edition of Practical Unix Security was published by O’Reilly. That means that June 2016 is the 25th anniversary of the publication of the book. How time flies! Read the history and think of participating in the special offer to help us celebrate the 25th anniversary of something significant! History In summer of 1990, Dan Farmer wrote the COPS scanner under my supervision. That toolset embodied a fair amount of domain expertise in Unix that I had accumulated in prior years, augmented with items that Dan found in his research. It generated a fair amount of “buzz” because it exposed issues that many people didn’t know and/or understand about Unix security. With the growth of Unix deployment (BSD, AT&T, Sun Microsystems, Sequent, Pyramid, HP, DEC, et al) there were many sites adopting Unix for the first time, and therefore many people without the requisite sysadmin and security skills. I thus started getting a great deal of encouragement to write a book on the topic. I consulted with some peers and investigated the deals offered by various publishers, and settled on O’Reilly Books as my first contact. I was using their Nutshell handbooks and liked those books a great deal: I appreciated their approach to getting good information in the hands of readers at a reasonable price. Tim O’Reilly is now known for his progressive views on publishing and pricing, but was still a niche publisher back then. […] Special Offer If you have someone (maybe yourself) who you’d like to provide with a special gift, here’s an offer of one that includes a donation to two worthwhile non-profit organizations. (This is in the spirit of my recent bow tie auction for charity.) You can make a difference as well as get something special! Over the years, Simson, Alan, and I have often been asked to autograph copies of the book. We know there is some continuing interest in this (I as asked again, last week). Furthermore, the 25th anniversary seems like a milestone worth noting with something special. Therefore, we are making this offer. For a contribution where everything after expenses will go to two worthwhile, non-profit organizations, you will get (at least) an autographed copy of an edition of Practical Unix & Internet Security!! Depending on the amount you include, I may throw in some extras. […]


Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

[ISN] [CFP] Speak About Your Cyberwar at PHDays VI

Forwarded fFrom: Alexander Lashkov Positive Hack Days VI, the international forum on practical information security, opens Call for Papers. Our international program committee consisting of very competent and experienced experts will consider every application, whether from a novice or a recognized expert in information security, and select the best proposals. Now, more than ever before, cybersecurity specialists are being asked to stop sitting on the fence and choose a side — competitive intelligence vs DLP systems; security system developers vs targeted cyberattacks; cryptographers vs reverse engineers; hackers vs security operations centers. A new concept of PHDays VI is designed to show what the current vibe is in information security. We want researchers to speak about the real dangerous threats and possible consequences. We also expect developers and integrators to give real answers to these threats rather than to talk about empowering security technologies. Come and share your experience at PHDays VI in Moscow, May 17 and 18, 2016. Your topic can revolve around any modern infosec field: new targeted attacks against SCADA, new threats to medical equipment, vulnerabilities of online government services, unusual techniques to protect mobile apps, antisocial engineering in social networks, or what psychological constitution SOC experts have. In addition, this year, we are planning to discuss IS software design, development tools, and SSDL principles. Our key criteria is that your research should be unique and offer a fresh perspective on hacking, modern information technologies, and the role they play in our lives. If you have something interesting or surprising to share, but none of the formats are suitable for your participation, please apply anyway and be sure we will consider your work. The first stage of CFP ends on January 31, 2016. Apply now — the number of final reports is limited. In 2015, the forum brought together 3,500 participants. In 2016, it is expected to see 4,000 attendees: information security leaders, CIO and CISO of the world’s largest companies, top managers of giant banks, industrial and oil and gas producing enterprises, telecoms, and IT vendors, representatives from different government departments. Positive Hack Days featured a variety of distinguished participants including Bruce Schneier (the legendary cryptography expert), Whitfield Diffie (one of the inventors of asymmetric cryptography), Mohd Noor Amin (IMPACT, UN), Natalya Kasperskaya (CEO of InfoWatch), Travis Goodspeed (a reverse engineer and wireless enthusiast from the U.S.), Tao Wan (the founder of China Eagle Union), Nick Galbreath (Vice-President of IPONWEB), Mushtaq Ahmed (Emirates Airline), Marc Heuse (the developer of Hydra, Amap, and THC-IPV6), Karsten Nohl (a specialist in GSM engineering), Donato Ferrante and Luigi Auriemma (famous SCADA experts from Italy), and Alexander Peslyak (the creator of the password cracking tool John the Ripper). Find any details about the format, participation rules, and CFP instructions on the PHDays website: www.phdays.com/call_for_papers/


Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

[ISN] Secret DHS Audit Could Prove Governmentwide Hacker Surveillance Isn’t Really Governmentwide

www.nextgov.com/cybersecurity/2015/11/secret-dhs-audit-could-prove-governmentwide-network-surveillance-isnt-really-governmentwide/124018/ By Aliya Sternstein Nextgov.com November 25, 2015 A secret federal audit substantiates a Senate committee’s concerns about underuse of a governmentwide cyberthreat surveillance tool, the panel’s chairman says. The intrusion-prevention system, named EINSTEIN 3 Accelerated, garnered both ridicule and praise following a hack of 21.5 million records on national security employees and their relatives. The scanning tool failed to block the attack, on an Office of Personnel network, because it can only detect malicious activity that people have seen before. At OPM, the attackers, believed to be well-resourced Chinese cyber sleuths, used malware that security researchers and U.S. spies had never witnessed. Still, EINSTEIN came in handy, according to U.S. officials, after the OPM malware was identified through other monitoring tools. The Department of Homeland Security loaded EINSTEIN with the “indicators” of the attack pattern so it could scan for matching footprints on other government networks. […]


Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail