Tag Archives: tools

Gartner Announces IT Operations Strategies & Solutions Summit 2018

Right now, the road to digital transformation runs through IT Operations. The adoption of fast-evolving technologies, methodologies, and tools have not only created new capabilities, but have become a catalyst for innovation across the enterprise. The Gartner IT Operations Strategies & Solutions Summit provides the tools for IT leaders to learn how to evaluate emerging trends in IT operations, achieve scale with DevOps, cloud and automation and align and integrate security and privacy

Gartner Announces Gartner Peer Insights Customers’ Choice Recognition for IT Service Management Tools

Gartner, Inc. announced today the 2018 Gartner Peer Insights Customers' Choice for IT Service Management (ITSM) Tools. The Peer Insights Customers' Choice is a recognition of vendors in this market by verified end-user professionals, taking into account both the number of end-user reviews and the overall user ratings.

Gartner Announces Data & Analytics Summit 2018

The Gartner Data & Analytics Summit 2018 provides the tools to build on the fundamentals of data management, business intelligence (BI), and analytics; harness innovative technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI), blockchain and the Internet of Things (IoT); and accelerate the shift toward a data-driven culture to lead the way to better business outcomes.

My latest Gartner research:Competitive Landscape: Endpoint Detection and Response Tools

5 January 2017  |  …EPP providers starting to offer EDR features. At least 50% of endpoint detection and responseproviders will incorporate enhanced analytics of user and attacker…the next 12 to 24 months, up from less than 15% today. The endpoint detection and response (EDR…

Gartner clients can access this research by clicking here.


[ISN] Surprise! America Already Has a Manhattan Project for Developing Cyber Attacks

http://www.wired.com/2015/02/americas-cyber-espionage-project-isnt-defense-waging-war By Kevin Poulsen Threat Level Wired.com 02.18.15 “What we really need is a Manhattan Project for cybersecurity.” It’s a sentiment that swells up every few years in the wake of some huge computer intrusion—most recently the Sony and Anthem hacks. The invocation of the legendary program that spawned the atomic bomb is telling. The Manhattan Project is America’s go-to shorthand for our deep conviction that if we gather the smartest scientists together and give them billions of dollars and a sense of urgency, we can achieve what otherwise would be impossible. A Google search on “cyber Manhattan Project” brings up results from as far back as 1997—it’s second only to “electronic Pearl Harbor” in computer-themed World War II allusions. In a much-circulated post on Medium last month, futurist Marc Goodman sets out what such a project would accomplish. “This Manhattan Project would help generate the associated tools we need to protect ourselves, including more robust, secure, and privacy-enhanced operating systems,” Goodman writes. “Through its research, it would also design and produce software and hardware that were self-healing and vastly more resistant to attack and resilient to failure than anything available today.” These arguments have so far not swayed a sitting American president. Sure, President Obama mentioned cybersecurity at the State of the Union, but his proposal not only doesn’t boost security research and development, it potentially criminalizes it. At the White House’s cybersecurity summit last week, Obama told Silicon Valley bigwigs that he understood the hacking problem well—“We all know what we need to do. We have to build stronger defenses and disrupt more attacks”—but his prescription this time was a tepid executive order aimed at improving information sharing between the government and industry. Those hoping for something more Rooseveltian must have been disappointed. On Monday, we finally learned the truth of it. America already has a computer security Manhattan Project. We’ve had it since at least 2001. Like the original, it has been highly classified, spawned huge technological advances in secret, and drawn some of the best minds in the country. We didn’t recognize it before because the project is not aimed at defense, as advocates hoped. Instead, like the original, America’s cyber Manhattan Project is purely offensive. […]


[ISN] CarolinaCon-11 is coming – March 20th-22nd 2015

Forwarded from: Vic Vandal h4x0rs, InfoSec geeks, script kidz, posers, and friends, CarolinaCon is back for its 11th year, which is also billed as “the last CarolinaCon as we know it”. For about the price of your average movie admission with popcorn and a drink ($20), YOU are invited to join us for yet another intimate and informative weekend of hacking-related education. This year’s event will be held on the weekend of March 20th-22nd 2015 in Raleigh NC at the North Raleigh Hilton (Midtown). The currently chosen lineup includes more presenters named Old Gregg than you’ll find at any conference anywhere, along with other esteemed individuals, such as; – Have you ever drunk Bailey’s from a shoe? (aka Pen-Testing & Social Engineering Convergence) – Old Gregg (smrk3r) – Cryptocurrency Laundering Theory for Fun and Retirement – Old Gregg (myddrn) – How to design your “You got hacked” page – Old Gregg (digital shokunin) – Electronics Engineering for Pen-Testers – Old Gregg (melvin2001) – Phony Business – What Goes Around Comes Back Around – Unregistered & Snide – Elevator Obscura: Industry Hacks & Answers to all Your Odd Questions About Those Magical Moving Rooms – Howard Payne & Deviant Ollam – Rethinking the Origins of the Lock – Schuyler Towne – RedneckSec – @th3mojo – Cyber War Stories – Andrew Shumate – One Step Closer to the Matrix: Machine Learning and Augmented Reality in Networking – Rob Weiss & John Eberhardt – I live in a van and so can you – Mark Rickert, aka Matt Foley – Drilling Deeper with Veil’s PowerTools – Justin Warner (@sixdub) & Will Schroeder (@harmj0y) – Hacker’s Practice Ground – Lokesh Pidawekar – Social engineering is bullsh*t, call it what it is – surpherdave – Anatomy of Web Client Attacks – Jason Gillam – Art of Post-infection Response and Mitigation – chill – SPAM, Phish and Other Things Good to Eat – Joshua Schroeder / JoshInGeneral …..and potentially 1-2 other l33t talks that we might be able to squeeze in! Side events currently on tap include; – Capture The Flag – Mobile Museum of Vintage Technology – Lockpicking Village – Hacker Trivia – Android Netrunner – Pulp Fiction Canonical Drinking Game – “Unofficial” Shootout (details at http://hackers.withguns.com/) For those traveling to the event or who simply want to stay at the Hilton venue throughout, hotel rooms at the special CarolinaCon group rate can be reserved via this link. http://www.hilton.com/en/hi/groups/personalized/R/RDUNHHF-CCC-20150319/index.jhtml?WT.mc_id=POG ALERT: The special group rate is only available until February 20th, so book now if interested. For other exciting details as they develop stay tuned to: http://www.carolinacon.org If you have any important questions about the event that are NOT answered in website content you can send an email to; infocarolinacon.org Peace, Vic


[ISN] Startup finds malware intrusions by keeping an eye on processor radio frequencies

http://www.networkworld.com/article/2875517/security0/startup-finds-malware-intrusions-by-keeping-an-eye-on-processor-radio-frequencies.html By Tim Greene Network World Jan 26, 2015 PFP Cybersecurity, a startup with roots in academia and the military, seeks out malware by analyzing the performance of hardware – not software and not the behavior of devices on the network. PFP’s system compares ongoing radio-frequency output from processors to a baseline that is established when the device is known to be performing legitimate tasks. When it detects anomalies that might represent malicious activity, it triggers alarms. Then it’s up to other tools to figure out what exactly is behind the problem. The system could be used to keep an eye on a large number of similar devices all performing the same task, such as those found in supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) networks that support power grids, chemical plants and the like. Savannah River National Laboratory is considering the gear for to protect its smart-grid relays. The system could also be used to check new devices as they are delivered from the plants where they are made in order to find faulty ones or ones that have been tampered with, the company says. […]


[ISN] About the infosec skills shortage

http://3vildata.tumblr.com/post/109188919632/about-the-infosec-skills-shortage By https://twitter.com/addelindh and https://twitter.com/0xtero http://3vildata.tumblr.com/ Jan 26th, 2015 Today I got into an argument on Twitter that started with me saying something sarcastic in reference to a recent statement by a vendor and ended with a discussion about the skills shortage in security. Twitter can be a difficult medium sometimes and I don’t really feel that I got my point across, so this is my attempt to correct that. Before I start I would like to point out that in no way do I think that this is the only reason there is a skills shortage in security, but that I do consider it a large contributing factor. In the beginning, there was firewalls Enterprise investment in security has traditionally been in products such as firewalls, anti-virus, IPS/IDS, and so on. Security products has in turn been marketed and sold as “solutions” rather than tools; heavily automated and not really much to work with. Because of this, they have been considered as infrastructure components rather than applications, you just install and configure them and then let them do their magic. Automation is great, until it isn’t The thing about buying automated solutions is that it removes the incentive to invest in knowledge of the problem the solution was supposed to solve. Why pay money so that someone can learn how to solve a problem that has already been solved, right? For an enterprise, this makes perfect sense, and for a while it worked. […]