Tag Archives: today

My latest Gartner research:Competitive Landscape: Endpoint Detection and Response Tools

5 January 2017  |  …EPP providers starting to offer EDR features. At least 50% of endpoint detection and responseproviders will incorporate enhanced analytics of user and attacker…the next 12 to 24 months, up from less than 15% today. The endpoint detection and response (EDR…

Gartner clients can access this research by clicking here.




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[ISN] Windows 10 Shares Your Wi-Fi With Contacts

http://krebsonsecurity.com/2015/07/windows-10-shares-your-wi-fi-with-contacts/ By Brian Krebs Krebs on Security July 29, 2015 Starting today, Microsoft is offering most Windows 7 and Windows 8 users a free upgrade to the software giant’s latest operating system — Windows 10. But there’s a very important security caveat that users should know about before transitioning to the new OS: Unless you opt out, Windows 10 will by default share your Wi-Fi network password with any contacts you may have listed in Outlook and Skype — and, with an opt-in, your Facebook friends. This brilliant new feature, which Microsoft has dubbed Wi-Fi Sense, doesn’t share your WiFi network password per se — it shares an encrypted version of that password. But it does allow anyone in your Skype or Outlook or Hotmail contacts lists to waltz onto your Wi-Fi network — should they ever wander within range of it or visit your home (or hop onto it secretly from hundreds of yards away with a good ‘ole cantenna!). I first read about this disaster waiting to happen over at The Register, which noted that Microsoft’s Wi-Fi Sense FAQ seeks to reassure would-be Windows 10 users that the Wi-Fi password will be sent encrypted and stored encrypted — on a Microsoft server. According to PCGamer, if you use Windows 10’s “Express” settings during installation, Wi-Fi Sense is enabled by default. […]


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[ISN] Senator Sasse: The OPM Hack May Have Given China a Spy Recruiting Database

http://www.wired.com/2015/07/senator-sasse-washington-still-isnt-taking-opm-breach-seriously/ By Senator Ben Sasse Security Wired.com 07.09.15 AS A NEWLY elected Senator, I am here to tell you a hard truth: Washington does not take cybersecurity seriously. But you probably already knew that if you’ve read anything about the massive OPM data breach. To recap today’s news from OPM, since 2013, a malicious attacker—likely the Chinese government—breached government databases and stole information on some 21 million federal employees. This included personal information like addresses and Social Security numbers. Most of these people held security clearances and for them it also included nearly 150 pages of material in what are called Standard Form 86s (SF-86), which detail nearly every aspect of their lives. Here’s the kicker: despite today’s jaw-dropping news, the attackers were in our networks so long that it may still be a while before we figure out everything they stole. Most news coverage has centered on federal employees. But that’s an incomplete picture because it’s now clear many victims never worked for the federal government. When applying for a security clearance with the SF-86, applicants list their family members, neighbors, co-workers, foreign contacts, and even college roommates. What this means is that not only do the hackers know lots of sensitive information about millions of government employees, they also know a great deal about many of the people they know and love. The implications for threats, intimidation, and blackmail are chilling. “Oh, you don’t want to sell out your country? OK, we get it. By the way, your parents still live at 2911 Rainbow Drive, right?” China may now have the largest spy-recruiting database in history. […]


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[ISN] Security Experts Hack Teleoperated Surgical Robot

http://www.technologyreview.com/view/537001/security-experts-hack-teleoperated-surgical-robot/ MIT Technology Review Emerging Technology From the arXiv April 24, 2015 A crucial bottleneck that prevents life-saving surgery being performed in many parts of the world is the lack of trained surgeons. One way to get around this is to make better use of the ones that are available. Sending them over great distances to perform operations is clearly inefficient because of the time that has to be spent travelling. So an increasingly important alternative is the possibility of telesurgery with an expert in one place controlling a robot in another that physically performs the necessary cutting and dicing. Indeed, the sale of medical robots is increasing at a rate of 20 percent per year. But while the advantages are clear, the disadvantages have been less well explored. Telesurgery relies on cutting edge technologies in fields as diverse as computing, robotics, communications, ergonomics, and so on. And anybody familiar with these areas will tell you that they are far from failsafe. Today, Tamara Bonaci and pals at the University of Washington in Seattle examine the special pitfalls associated with the communications technology involved in telesurgery. In particular, they show how a malicious attacker can disrupt the behavior of a telerobot during surgery and even take over such a robot, the first time a medical robot has been hacked in this way. […]


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[ISN] Heartbleed a Year Later: How the Security Conversation Changed

http://www.eweek.com/security/heartbleed-a-year-later-how-the-security-conversation-changed.html By Sean Michael Kerner eWEEK.com 2015-04-07 A year ago today (April 7), I first saw the OpenSSL advisory about a new security vulnerability identified as CVE-2014-0160 and titled “TLS heartbeat read overrun.” When I first wrote my article for eWEEK on the issue, I identified the flaw as the Heartbeat SSL flaw. By the middle of the day on April 8, my editors at eWEEK were asking me if I had mislabeled the story since other publications were calling it Heartbleed. Time sure does fly. The name Heartbleed is the branded term that security firm Codenomicon came up with. They also branded the vulnerability in a way that I had never seen before, but has since become a model that other security vendors have tried to emulate. The Codenomicon-branded Heartbleed had its own logo and an easy-to-follow description of the flaw and the actual risks. As it turned out, the issue was also discovered by Google security researcher Neil Mehta. Both Mehta and Codenomicon were awarded the Black Hat 2014 Pwnie award for Heartbleed in the category of best server-side bug. […]


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[ISN] FBI Threat Intelligence Cyber-Analysts Still Marginalized In Agency

http://www.darkreading.com/risk/fbi-threat-intelligence-cyber-analysts-still-marginalized-in-agency/d/d-id/1319618 By Sara Peters Dark Reading 3/25/2015 Despite good progress, 9/11 Review Commission says that analysts could have a greater impact on FBI counter-terrorism activities if they had more domain awareness, forensics capabilities, and were more empowered to question agents. FBI threat intelligence analysts, a position created post-9/11, have proven their worth to counter-terror operations, but their impact has been limited by a lack of domain awareness, insufficient computing technology, and a lack of status within the Bureau, according to a report released today by the FBI 9/11 Review Commission. While the analysts are providing agents with tactical input, they are not yet participating in any strategic way. Part of the intelligence analysts’ job description, as described by FBIAgentEdu.org, is cyber-forensics and cyber-surveillance


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[ISN] Sony Pictures Confirms Hack-Delayed Q3 Profit of $51m, More Than Double February Forecast

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/sony-pictures-confirms-hack-delayed-782423 By Gavin J. Blair The Hollywood Reporter 3/17/2015 Sony Pictures generated profits of $51 million (¥6.2 billion) in the quarter ending Dec. 31, the period affected by the hacking attack, more than the $20 million it had predicted in February, Sony Corp. announced in Tokyo on Tuesday. Sales at the pictures division were $1.707 billion (¥206.6 billion) for the quarter, up from the Feb. 4 estimate of $1.633 billion. Compared to the same quarter in 2013, sales were down 20 percent on a dollar basis, but only 7.7 percent in yen, due to the weakening of the Japanese currency. The final announcement of Sony’s third-quarter earnings was delayed by the hack by a group calling itself Guardians of Peace, which caused huge disruption to the operations of Sony Pictures Entertainment in November and December. Sony explained at the Feb. 4 provisional announcement that much of the damage caused by the hack was covered by insurance and predicted a cost of approximately $15 million, an amount confirmed in today’s figures. […]


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