Tag Archives: special

[ISN] IoT risks raise concerns among IT specialists in central and eastern Europe

www.computerweekly.com/news/4500272253/IoT-risks-raise-concerns-among-IT-specialists-in-CEE By Krzysztof Polak ComputerWeekly.com 04 Feb 2016 The internet of things (IoT) has gone from an industry buzzword to a highly promising phenomenon in central and eastern Europe – but IT specialists are concerned about how to protect networks from the extra strain of new connected devices. The driving force behind IoT is the desire to gain knowledge and insights about, for example, buildings, cars, industrial installations, healthcare, aviation and civil infrastructure, using smart and connected devices. But according to Sylwester Chojnacki, director, enterprise business group at Huawei CEE, the designers of IoT equipment have not learned the lessons from the early years of internet development. “They do not pay sufficient attention to the safety of devices and applications,” he said. IoT devices are often the first target in cyber attacks, leading to intrusions into computer systems and large databases. […]




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[ISN] Here’s what ‘Shmoocon 2016,’ the D.C. hackerfest, tells us about the cybersecurity industry

www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-business/wp/2016/01/28/heres-whats-changing-in-d-c-s-hacker-community/ By Aaron Gregg The Washington Post January 28, 2016 Walking around Shmoocon, a D.C. cybersecurity conference in its 12th year, one gets the impression that the hacker community is growing out of a bit of its outrageousness. “There’s a chaotic element to it that has really fallen off,” said Shmoocon founder Bruce Potter. “All the shenanigans you used to see; dumping Jello in the fountain in Vegas…you don’t even see it anywhere anymore.” To be sure, the cultural quirks are still there. Grown men still call each other by over-the-top hacker aliases. A man walks around wearing a chicken mask with a fluorescent-green box strapped to this back blaring electronic music. With the exception of a group of West Point cadets, everyone is wearing T-shirts. But the crowd’s absurdities make it easy to forget that these are some of the most sought-after professionals in business, government and war. Over the past few years costly and highly-public instances of data theft have driven huge corporations to give cybersecurity professionals C-suite representation for the first time. And there’s a massive dearth of trained cybersecurity professionals, even in the Washington area: a 2015 report from market research firm Burning Glass found almost 50,000 open positions for cybersecurity professionals across the country with an advertised average salary of $83,934. As a result, conferences like Shmoocon have become central nodes where corporate and government recruiters find cyber talent. Local economic development boosters are targeting cybersecurity as a growth sector for the region, hoping they can capitalize on the steady stream of specialized talent that spills out the region’s military and intelligence agencies. […]


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[ISN] 8 out of 10 mobile health apps open to HIPAA violations, hacking, data theft

www.healthcareitnews.com/news/8-out-10-mobile-health-apps-open-hipaa-violations-hacking-data-theft By Bill Siwicki Healthcare IT News January 13, 2016 A new report shows 84 percent of U.S. FDA-approved health apps tested by IT security vendor Arxan Technologies did not adequately address at least two of the Open Web Application Security Project top 10 risks. Most health apps are susceptible to code tampering and reverse-engineering, two of the most common hacking techniques, the report found. Ninety-five percent of the FDA-approved apps lack binary protection and have insufficient transport layer protection, leaving them open to hacks that could result in privacy violations, theft of personal health information, as well as device tampering and patient safety issues. The new research from Arxan, which this year placed special emphasis on mobile health apps, was based on analysis of 126 popular health and finance apps from the United States. United Kingdom, Germany and Japan. There is a disparity between consumer confidence and the attention given to security by app developers, the study found. While the majority of app users and app executives said they believe their apps are secure, nearly all apps Arxan assessed proved to be vulnerable […]


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[ISN] A looming anniversary, and a special offer

www.cerias.purdue.edu/site/blog/post/a_looming_anniversary_and_a_special_offer/ [This was posted on Twitter Thursday by Gene Spafford – @TheRealSpaf and I figured I should share this with the list. Please check out the above link for complete details, history, and the special offer! – WK] Sunday, December 06, 2015 by spaf It may seem odd to consider June 2016 as January approaches, but I try to think ahead. And June 2016 is a milestone anniversary of sorts. So, I will start with some history, and then an offer to get something special and make a charitable donation at the same time. In June of 1991, the first edition of Practical Unix Security was published by O’Reilly. That means that June 2016 is the 25th anniversary of the publication of the book. How time flies! Read the history and think of participating in the special offer to help us celebrate the 25th anniversary of something significant! History In summer of 1990, Dan Farmer wrote the COPS scanner under my supervision. That toolset embodied a fair amount of domain expertise in Unix that I had accumulated in prior years, augmented with items that Dan found in his research. It generated a fair amount of “buzz” because it exposed issues that many people didn’t know and/or understand about Unix security. With the growth of Unix deployment (BSD, AT&T, Sun Microsystems, Sequent, Pyramid, HP, DEC, et al) there were many sites adopting Unix for the first time, and therefore many people without the requisite sysadmin and security skills. I thus started getting a great deal of encouragement to write a book on the topic. I consulted with some peers and investigated the deals offered by various publishers, and settled on O’Reilly Books as my first contact. I was using their Nutshell handbooks and liked those books a great deal: I appreciated their approach to getting good information in the hands of readers at a reasonable price. Tim O’Reilly is now known for his progressive views on publishing and pricing, but was still a niche publisher back then. […] Special Offer If you have someone (maybe yourself) who you’d like to provide with a special gift, here’s an offer of one that includes a donation to two worthwhile non-profit organizations. (This is in the spirit of my recent bow tie auction for charity.) You can make a difference as well as get something special! Over the years, Simson, Alan, and I have often been asked to autograph copies of the book. We know there is some continuing interest in this (I as asked again, last week). Furthermore, the 25th anniversary seems like a milestone worth noting with something special. Therefore, we are making this offer. For a contribution where everything after expenses will go to two worthwhile, non-profit organizations, you will get (at least) an autographed copy of an edition of Practical Unix & Internet Security!! Depending on the amount you include, I may throw in some extras. […]


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[ISN] [CFP] Speak About Your Cyberwar at PHDays VI

Forwarded fFrom: Alexander Lashkov Positive Hack Days VI, the international forum on practical information security, opens Call for Papers. Our international program committee consisting of very competent and experienced experts will consider every application, whether from a novice or a recognized expert in information security, and select the best proposals. Now, more than ever before, cybersecurity specialists are being asked to stop sitting on the fence and choose a side — competitive intelligence vs DLP systems; security system developers vs targeted cyberattacks; cryptographers vs reverse engineers; hackers vs security operations centers. A new concept of PHDays VI is designed to show what the current vibe is in information security. We want researchers to speak about the real dangerous threats and possible consequences. We also expect developers and integrators to give real answers to these threats rather than to talk about empowering security technologies. Come and share your experience at PHDays VI in Moscow, May 17 and 18, 2016. Your topic can revolve around any modern infosec field: new targeted attacks against SCADA, new threats to medical equipment, vulnerabilities of online government services, unusual techniques to protect mobile apps, antisocial engineering in social networks, or what psychological constitution SOC experts have. In addition, this year, we are planning to discuss IS software design, development tools, and SSDL principles. Our key criteria is that your research should be unique and offer a fresh perspective on hacking, modern information technologies, and the role they play in our lives. If you have something interesting or surprising to share, but none of the formats are suitable for your participation, please apply anyway and be sure we will consider your work. The first stage of CFP ends on January 31, 2016. Apply now — the number of final reports is limited. In 2015, the forum brought together 3,500 participants. In 2016, it is expected to see 4,000 attendees: information security leaders, CIO and CISO of the world’s largest companies, top managers of giant banks, industrial and oil and gas producing enterprises, telecoms, and IT vendors, representatives from different government departments. Positive Hack Days featured a variety of distinguished participants including Bruce Schneier (the legendary cryptography expert), Whitfield Diffie (one of the inventors of asymmetric cryptography), Mohd Noor Amin (IMPACT, UN), Natalya Kasperskaya (CEO of InfoWatch), Travis Goodspeed (a reverse engineer and wireless enthusiast from the U.S.), Tao Wan (the founder of China Eagle Union), Nick Galbreath (Vice-President of IPONWEB), Mushtaq Ahmed (Emirates Airline), Marc Heuse (the developer of Hydra, Amap, and THC-IPV6), Karsten Nohl (a specialist in GSM engineering), Donato Ferrante and Luigi Auriemma (famous SCADA experts from Italy), and Alexander Peslyak (the creator of the password cracking tool John the Ripper). Find any details about the format, participation rules, and CFP instructions on the PHDays website: www.phdays.com/call_for_papers/


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[ISN] Civilian found living in barracks on Fort Bragg

www.fayobserver.com/military/civilian-found-living-in-special-forces-barracks-on-fort-bragg/article_dfe374fe-846e-5dfd-9459-bb73a6d27fbe.html By Drew Brooks Military Editor fayobserver.com December 17, 2015 Investigators are looking into how a civilian was able to move into barracks reserved for Fort Bragg’s 3rd Special Forces Group. A spokesman for the group confirmed the unit discovered a civilian living in the barracks on Wednesday and reported the matter to Fort Bragg’s Provost Marshal’s Office. The spokesman could not provide additional details, but said the situation was under investigation. The popular Facebook account U.S. Army W.T.F. Moments also has reported on the incident. […]


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[ISN] Hacked at sea: Researchers find ships’ data recorders vulnerable to attack

arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/12/hacked-at-sea-researchers-find-ships-data-recorders-vulnerable-to-attack/ By Sean Gallagher Ars Technica Dec 10, 2015 When the freighter El Faro was lost in a hurricane on October 1, one of the goals of the salvage operation was to recover its voyage data recorder (VDR)—the maritime equivalent of the “black box” carried aboard airliners. The VDR, required aboard all large commercial ships (and any passenger ships over 150 gross tons), collects a wealth of data about the ship’s systems as well as audio from the bridge of the ship, radio communications, radar, and navigation data. Writing its data to storage within a protective capsule with an acoustic beacon, the VDR is an essential part of investigating any incident at sea, acting as an automated version of a ship’s logbook. Sometimes, that data can be awfully inconvenient. While the data in the VDR is the property of the ship owner, it can be taken by an investigator in the event of an accident or other incident—and that may not always be in the ship owner’s (or crew’s) interest. The VDRs aboard the cruise ship Costa Concordia were used as evidence in the manslaughter trial of the ship’s captain and other crewmembers. Likewise, that data could be valuable to others—especially if it can be tapped into live. It turns out that some VDRs may not be very good witnesses. As a report recently published by the security firm IOActive points out, VDRs can be hacked, and their data can be stolen or destroyed. The US Coast Guard is developing policies to help defend against “transportation security incidents” caused by cyber-attacks against shipping, including issuing guidance to vessel operators on how to secure their systems and reviewing the design of required marine systems—including VDRs. That’s promising to be a tall order, especially taking the breadth of systems installed on the over 80,000 cargo and passenger vessels in the world. And given the types of criminal activity recently highlighted by the New York Times’ “Outlaw Ocean” reports, there’s plenty of reason for some ship operators to not want VDRs to be secure—including covering up environmental issues, incidents at sea with other vessels, and sometimes even murder. […]


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[ISN] Cymmetria hires former U.S. government cyber official Jim Christy

www.reuters.com/article/2015/11/27/us-cymmetria-hire-idUSKBN0TG28W20151127 By Jim Finkle Reuters.com Nov 27, 2015 Computer security startup Cymmetria has hired a well-known retired U.S. government computer-forensics expert, Jim Christy, as vice president of investigations and digital forensics. Christy started this week at the provider of technology that targets the psychology of attackers, tricking them into revealing themselves through techniques such as the use of decoy servers. Cymmetria told Reuters on Friday that Christy will oversee efforts to help clients investigate attacks uncovered with the company’s technology, then advise them on coordinating disclosure to law enforcement. He retired from the U.S. government in 2013, ending a career investigating computer crimes and running digital forensics labs that began in 1986 at the Air Force Office of Special Investigations. […]


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