Tag Archives: software

My latest Gartner research: Market Opportunity Map: Security and Risk Management Software, Worldwide

20 April 2017  |  The security software market is transforming through four vectors: analytics, adoption of SaaS and managed services, expanded ecosystems, and regulations. Technology business unit leaders must realign their product and go-to-market strategies to address these key forces….

Gartner clients can access this research by clicking here.




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My latest Gartner research: Market Insight: Security Market Transformation Disrupted by the Emergence of Smart, Pervasive and Efficient Security

1 February 2017  |  …fits into/addresses these situations. Analysis by Perry Carpenter and Lawrence Pingree Technologies such as cloud, software-defined networking (SDN), network…or managed services. Analysis by Ruggero Contu, Perry Carpenter and Lawrence Pingree By 2020, integrated security models, such as…

Gartner clients can access this research by clicking here.


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My latest Gartner Research: SWOT: Check Point Software Technologies, Network Security, Worldwide

Check Point remains a leading security vendor, with a strong and broad portfolio that has improved with the pace of innovation. However, its product leaders need better marketing and refined renewal pricing strategies to sustain its growth and leadership in the firewall market….

Gartner subscribers can access this research by clicking here.


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[ISN] Critical BIND denial-of-service flaw could disrupt large portions of the Internet

http://www.computerworld.com/article/2955005/security/critical-bind-denialofservice-flaw-could-disrupt-large-portions-of-the-internet.html By Lucian Constantin IDG News Service July 30, 2015 Attackers could exploit a new vulnerability in BIND, the most popular Domain Name System (DNS) server software, to disrupt the Internet for many users. The vulnerability affects all versions of BIND 9, from BIND 9.1.0 to BIND 9.10.2-P2, and can be exploited to crash DNS servers that are powered by the software. The Domain Name System is the Internet’s phone book. It’s used to convert domain and host names into numerical Internet Protocol (IP) addresses that computers need to communicate with each other. The DNS is made up of a global network of servers and a very large number of them run BIND, a software package developed and maintained by a nonprofit corporation called the Internet Systems Consortium (ISC). The vulnerability, announced and patched by ISC Tuesday, is critical because it can be used to crash both authoritative and recursive DNS servers with a single packet. […]


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[ISN] Windows 10 Shares Your Wi-Fi With Contacts

http://krebsonsecurity.com/2015/07/windows-10-shares-your-wi-fi-with-contacts/ By Brian Krebs Krebs on Security July 29, 2015 Starting today, Microsoft is offering most Windows 7 and Windows 8 users a free upgrade to the software giant’s latest operating system — Windows 10. But there’s a very important security caveat that users should know about before transitioning to the new OS: Unless you opt out, Windows 10 will by default share your Wi-Fi network password with any contacts you may have listed in Outlook and Skype — and, with an opt-in, your Facebook friends. This brilliant new feature, which Microsoft has dubbed Wi-Fi Sense, doesn’t share your WiFi network password per se — it shares an encrypted version of that password. But it does allow anyone in your Skype or Outlook or Hotmail contacts lists to waltz onto your Wi-Fi network — should they ever wander within range of it or visit your home (or hop onto it secretly from hundreds of yards away with a good ‘ole cantenna!). I first read about this disaster waiting to happen over at The Register, which noted that Microsoft’s Wi-Fi Sense FAQ seeks to reassure would-be Windows 10 users that the Wi-Fi password will be sent encrypted and stored encrypted — on a Microsoft server. According to PCGamer, if you use Windows 10’s “Express” settings during installation, Wi-Fi Sense is enabled by default. […]


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[ISN] Hackers give up when they go up against this cybersecurity company

http://fortune.com/2015/07/29/crowdstrike-cybersecurity-george-kurtz/ By Robert Hackett @rhhackett Fortune.com July 29, 2015 It’s not every day that a company can compel hackers to give up. Yet that’s exactly what CrowdStrike managed to do earlier this year. CEO and co-founder George Kurtz tells it like this: A besieged customer needed backup. So Kurtz’s team sent in reinforcements, placed its cloud-based software sensors across the breached business’s computing environment, and started gathering intel. Aha! Investigators spotted Hurricane Panda, an old Chinese nemesis that Kurtz’s crew had been battling since 2013. What happened next surprised them: When the attackers scanned an infected machine only to find traces of CrowdStrike, they fled. CrowdStrike’s reputation precedes it. The company, founded in 2011 and based in Irvine, Calif., has gone toe-to-toe with some of the world’s most sophisticated state-sponsored hacking groups. The firm analyzed the data behind the breaches of millions of sensitive records at the Office of Personnel Management, the federal agency responsible for human resources, in what may have been the biggest act of cyberespionage the U.S. has ever seen. It has published threat reports on many of the more than 50 adversaries it tracks, which include the likes of Ghost Jackal (the Syrian Electronic Army), Viceroy Tiger (an Indian intruder), and Andromeda Spider (a criminal coterie). Between 2013 and 2014 its revenue grew 142% and its customer base more than tripled, two reasons Google Capital GOOG 0.63% , the tech giant’s growth equity arm, led a $100 million investment in CrowdStrike in July, its first ever for a computer security company. Kurtz used to travel hundreds of thousands of miles a year as CTO of McAfee, now called Intel Security INTC 0.17% , to meet with beleaguered customers. It struck him that they did not need more anti-malware and antivirus products, the traditional realm of information security, so much as software oriented toward tradecraft and technique, the domain of cyberspies. Co-founder and CTO Dmitri Alperovitch, then McAfee’s head of threat intelligence, agreed. […]


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[ISN] Hackers Can Disable a Sniper Rifle — Or Change Its Target

http://www.wired.com/2015/07/hackers-can-disable-sniper-rifleor-change-target/ By Andy Greenberg Security Wired.com 07.29.15 PUT A COMPUTER on a sniper rifle, and it can turn the most amateur shooter into a world-class marksman. But add a wireless connection to that computer-aided weapon, and you may find that your smart gun suddenly seems to have a mind of its own—and a very different idea of the target. At the Black Hat hacker conference in two weeks, security researchers Runa Sandvik and Michael Auger plan to present the results of a year of work hacking a pair of $13,000 TrackingPoint self-aiming rifles. The married hacker couple have developed a set of techniques that could allow an attacker to compromise the rifle via its Wi-Fi connection and exploit vulnerabilities in its software. Their tricks can change variables in the scope’s calculations that make the rifle inexplicably miss its target, permanently disable the scope’s computer, or even prevent the gun from firing. In a demonstration for WIRED (shown in the video above), the researchers were able to dial in their changes to the scope’s targeting system so precisely that they could cause a bullet to hit a bullseye of the hacker’s choosing rather than the one chosen by the shooter. “You can make it lie constantly to the user so they’ll always miss their shot,” says Sandvik, a former developer for the anonymity software Tor. Or the attacker can just as easily lock out the user or erase the gun’s entire file system. “If the scope is bricked, you have a six to seven thousand dollar computer you can’t use on top of a rifle that you still have to aim yourself.” […]


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