Tag Archives: option

My latest Gartner research: Market Opportunity Map: Security and Risk Management Software, Worldwide

20 April 2017  |  The security software market is transforming through four vectors: analytics, adoption of SaaS and managed services, expanded ecosystems, and regulations. Technology business unit leaders must realign their product and go-to-market strategies to address these key forces….

Gartner clients can access this research by clicking here.




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Optimized Squid Config for Squid v4.0.4

For those of you who are squid optimization geeks. Below is my latest iteration of the squid.conf file I am now using for 4.0.4

#
#Recommended minimum configuration:
#
always_direct allow all

# 3 workers, using worker #1 as the frontend is important

# Example rule allowing access from your local networks.
# Adapt to list your (internal) IP networks from where browsing
# should be allowed
acl localnet src 192.168.0.0/16
acl localnet src fc00::/7
acl localnet src fe80::/10 # RFC1918 possible internal network
acl Safe_ports port 1-65535 # RFC1918 possible internal network
acl CONNECT method GET POST HEAD OPTIONS CONNECT PUT DELETE # RFC1918 possible internal network
#acl block-fnes urlpath_regex -i .*/fnes/echo # RFC 4193 local private network range
acl noscan dstdomain symantecliveupdate.com liveupdate.symantec.com psi3.secunia.com update.immunet.com avstats.avira.com premium.avira-update.com 8f8fb293be49781da3e3229cd4469a18.da3e3.net # RFC 4291 link-local (directly plugged) machines

# Disable alternate protocols
request_header_access Alternate-Protocol deny all
reply_header_access Alternate-Protocol deny all

#acl video urlpath_regex -i \.(mpa|m2a|mpe|avi|mov|mpg|mpg3|mpg4|mpeg|m1s|mp2v|m2v|m2s|wmx|rm|rmvb|3pg|3gpp|omg|ogm|asf|asx|mp2|mp3|mp4|wmv|flv|ts|f4v|f4m)

#
# Recommended minimum Access Permission configuration:
#
# Only allow cachemgr access from localhost

no_cache deny noscan
always_direct allow noscan
#no_cache deny video
#always_direct allow video

# Deny requests to certain unsafe ports

# Deny CONNECT to other than secure SSL ports

# We strongly recommend the following be uncommented to protect innocent
# web applications running on the proxy server who think the only
# one who can access services on .localhost. is a local user
#http_access deny to_localhost

#
# INSERT YOUR OWN RULE(S) HERE TO ALLOW ACCESS FROM YOUR CLIENTS
#
#cache_peer 192.168.1.1 parent 8080 0 default no-query no-digest no-netdb-exchange
#never_direct allow all

# Example rule allowing access from your local networks.
# Adapt localnet in the ACL section to list your (internal) IP networks
# from where browsing should be allowed

http_access allow all

# allow localhost always proxy functionality

# And finally deny all other access to this proxy

# Squid normally listens to port 3128
pipeline_prefetch 7
read_ahead_gap 256 MB
client_request_buffer_max_size 4096 KB
request_header_max_size 2048 KB
reply_header_max_size 2048 KB
#quick_abort_min -1 KB
#quick_abort_pct 100
#range_offset_limit -1
eui_lookup off
http_port 0.0.0.0:8080 intercept disable-pmtu-discovery=always
http_port 0.0.0.0:3128
tcp_outgoing_address 192.168.2.2
connect_retries 1

client_persistent_connections on
server_persistent_connections on
detect_broken_pconn on

# We recommend you to use at least the following line.
#hierarchy_stoplist cgi-bin ?

# Uncomment and adjust the following to add a disk cache directory.
#cache_dir diskd /ssd/0 54000 32 256 Q1=256 Q2=144
#cache_dir diskd /ssd/1 54000 32 256 Q1=256 Q2=144
#cache_dir diskd /ssd/3 54000 32 256 Q1=256 Q2=144

#cache_dir diskd /ssd2/0 68000 32 256 Q1=256 Q2=144
#cache_dir diskd /ssd2/1 68000 32 256 Q1=256 Q2=144
#cache_dir diskd /ssd2/3 68000 32 256 Q1=256 Q2=144

cache_dir ufs /ssd/0 32000 1024 256
cache_dir ufs /ssd/1 32000 1024 256
cache_dir ufs /ssd/2 32000 1024 256
cache_dir ufs /ssd/3 32000 1024 256
cache_dir ufs /ssd/4 32000 1024 256
cache_dir ufs /ssd/5 32000 1024 256

cache_dir ufs /ssd2/0 43000 1024 256
cache_dir ufs /ssd2/1 43000 1024 256
cache_dir ufs /ssd2/2 43000 1024 256
cache_dir ufs /ssd2/3 43000 1024 256
cache_dir ufs /ssd2/4 43000 1024 256
cache_dir ufs /ssd2/6 43000 1024 256

store_dir_select_algorithm round-robin
#cache_replacement_policy heap GDSF
#memory_replacement_policy heap GDSF

# Leave coredumps in the first cache dir
coredump_dir /var/cache/squid

# Add any of your own refresh_pattern entries above these.
# General Rules
#cache images

refresh_pattern -i \.(gif|png|ico|jpg|jpeg|jp2|webp)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private
refresh_pattern -i \.(jpx|j2k|j2c|fpx|bmp|tif|tiff|bif)$ 100000 90% 20000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private
refresh_pattern -i \.(pcd|pict|rif|exif|hdr|bpg|img|jif|jfif)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private
refresh_pattern -i \.(woff|woff2|eps|ttf|otf|svg|svgi|svgz|ps|ps1|acsm|eot)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private

#cache content
refresh_pattern -i \.(swf|js|ejs)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private
refresh_pattern -i \.(wav|css|class|dat|zsci|ver|advcs)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private

#cache videos
refresh_pattern -i \.(mpa|m2a|mpe|avi|mov|mpg|mpeg|mpg3|mpg4|mpg5)$ 0 90% 200000 reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private
refresh_pattern -i \.(m1s|mp2v|m2v|m2s|m2ts|wmx|rm|rmvb|3pg|3gpp|omg|ogm|asf|war)$ 0 90% 200000 reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private
refresh_pattern -i \.(asx|mp2|mp3|mp4|mp5|wmv|flv|mts|f4v|f4|pls|midi|mid)$ 0 90% 200000 reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private
refresh_pattern -i \.(htm|html)$ 9440 90% 200000 reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private
refresh_pattern -i \.(xml|flow|asp|aspx)$ 0 90% 200000
refresh_pattern -i \.(json)$ 0 90% 200000
refresh_pattern -i (/cgi-bin/|\?) 0 90% 200000

#live video cache rules
refresh_pattern -i \.(m3u8|ts)$ 0 90% 200000

#cache specific sites
refresh_pattern -i ^http:\/\/liveupdate.symantecliveupdate.com.*\(zip)$ 0 0% 0
refresh_pattern -i ^http:\/\/premium.avira-update.com.*\(gz) 0 0% 0
refresh_pattern -i microsoft.com/.*\.(cab|exe|msi|msu|msf|asf|wma|dat|zip)$ 4320 80% 43200
refresh_pattern -i windowsupdate.com/.*\.(cab|exe|msi|msu|msf|asf|wma|wmv)|dat|zip)$ 4320 80% 43200
refresh_pattern -i windows.com/.*\.(cab|exe|msi|msu|msf|asf|wmv|wma|dat|zip)$ 4320 80% 43200
refresh_pattern -i apple.com/.*\.(cab|exe|msi|msu|msf|asf|wmv|wma|dat|zip|dist)$ 0 80% 4320

#cache binaries
refresh_pattern -i \.(app|bin|deb|rpm|drpm|exe|zip|zipx|tar|tgz|tbz2|tlz|iso|arj|cfs|dar|jar)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private
refresh_pattern -i \.(bz|bz2|ipa|ram|rar|uxx|gz|msi|dll|lz|lzma|7z|s7z|Z|z|zz|sz)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private
refresh_pattern -i \.(exe|msi)$ 0 90% 200000
refresh_pattern -i \.(cab|psf|vidt|apk|wtex|hz|ova|ovf)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private

#cache microsoft and adobe and other documents
refresh_pattern -i \.(ppt|pptx|doc|docx|docm|docb|dot|pdf|pub|ps)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private
refresh_pattern -i \.(xls|xlsx|xlt|xlm|xlsm|xltm|xlw|csv|txt)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private
#refresh_pattern -i ^ftp: 100000 90% 200000
#refresh_pattern -i ^gopher: 1440 0% 1440

#allow caching of other things based on cache control headers with some exceptions
refresh_pattern -i . 0 90% 200000

log_icp_queries off
icp_port 0
htcp_port 0
acl snmppublic snmp_community public
snmp_port 3401
snmp_incoming_address 192.168.2.2
snmp_access allow snmppublic all
minimum_object_size 0 KB
cache_effective_user squid
#header_replace User-Agent Mozilla/5.0 (X11; U;) Gecko/20080221 Firefox/2.0.0.9
vary_ignore_expire on
cache_swap_low 90
cache_swap_high 95
visible_hostname shadow
unique_hostname shadow-DHS
shutdown_lifetime 0 second
request_entities on
half_closed_clients off
max_filedesc 65535
connect_timeout 10 seconds
cache_effective_group squid
buffered_logs on
#access_log /var/log/squid/access.log squid
access_log daemon:/var/log/squid/access.log buffer-size=256KB
#access_log none
netdb_filename none
client_db off
dns_nameservers 127.0.0.1 127.0.0.1 192.168.2.2 192.168.1.96
ipcache_size 10000
ipcache_low 90
ipcache_high 95
dns_v4_first on
negative_ttl 5 minutes
positive_dns_ttl 30 days
negative_dns_ttl 5 minutes
dns_retransmit_interval 1 seconds
check_hostnames off
forwarded_for delete
via off
httpd_suppress_version_string on
# mem and cache size
#collapsed_forwarding on
cache_mem 4 GB
memory_cache_mode disk
maximum_object_size 2 GB
maximum_object_size_in_memory 2 GB
digest_generation off
#digest_bits_per_entry 8
pinger_enable off
memory_pools on
max_stale 4 months


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My latest optimized squid proxy squid.conf configuration file (squid version 4.0.3)

#You will need to replace x.x.x.x with your own ip configuration. The refresh policy included in this configuration cached hits in the range of 40-60%

 

#
#Recommended minimum configuration:
#
always_direct allow all

# Example rule allowing access from your local networks.
# Adapt to list your (internal) IP networks from where browsing
# should be allowed
acl localnet src x.x.0.0/16
acl localnet src fc00::/7
acl localnet src fe80::/10 # RFC1918 possible internal network
acl Safe_ports port 1-65535 # RFC1918 possible internal network
acl CONNECT method GET POST HEAD OPTIONS CONNECT PUT DELETE # RFC1918 possible internal network
#acl block-fnes urlpath_regex -i .*/fnes/echo # RFC 4193 local private network range
acl noscan dstdomain symantecliveupdate.com liveupdate.symantec.com psi3.secunia.com update.immunet.com avstats.avira.com premium.avira-update.com 8f8fb293be49781da3e3229cd4469a18.da3e3.net # RFC 4291 link-local (directly plugged) machines

#acl video urlpath_regex -i \.(mpa|m2a|mpe|avi|mov|mpg|mpg3|mpg4|mpeg|m1s|mp2v|m2v|m2s|wmx|rm|rmvb|3pg|3gpp|omg|ogm|asf|asx|mp2|mp3|mp4|wmv|flv|ts|f4v|f4m)

#
# Recommended minimum Access Permission configuration:
#
# Only allow cachemgr access from localhost

no_cache deny noscan
always_direct allow noscan
#no_cache deny video
#always_direct allow video

# Deny requests to certain unsafe ports

# Deny CONNECT to other than secure SSL ports

# We strongly recommend the following be uncommented to protect innocent
# web applications running on the proxy server who think the only
# one who can access services on .localhost. is a local user
#http_access deny to_localhost

#
# INSERT YOUR OWN RULE(S) HERE TO ALLOW ACCESS FROM YOUR CLIENTS
#
#cache_peer 192.168.1.1 parent 8080 0 default no-query no-digest no-netdb-exchange
#never_direct allow all

# Example rule allowing access from your local networks.
# Adapt localnet in the ACL section to list your (internal) IP networks
# from where browsing should be allowed

http_access allow all

# allow localhost always proxy functionality

# And finally deny all other access to this proxy
# Squid normally listens to port 3128
pipeline_prefetch 4
read_ahead_gap 256 MB
client_request_buffer_max_size 16 MB
#quick_abort_min -1 KB
#quick_abort_pct 100
#range_offset_limit -1
eui_lookup off
http_port 0.0.0.0:8080 intercept disable-pmtu-discovery=always
http_port 0.0.0.0:3128
tcp_outgoing_address x.x.x.x
connect_retries 2

client_persistent_connections on
server_persistent_connections on
detect_broken_pconn on

# We recommend you to use at least the following line.
#hierarchy_stoplist cgi-bin ?
# Uncomment and adjust the following to add a disk cache directory.
#cache_dir diskd /ssd/0 54000 32 256 Q1=256 Q2=144
#cache_dir diskd /ssd/1 54000 32 256 Q1=256 Q2=144
#cache_dir diskd /ssd/3 54000 32 256 Q1=256 Q2=144

#cache_dir diskd /ssd2/0 68000 32 256 Q1=256 Q2=144
#cache_dir diskd /ssd2/1 68000 32 256 Q1=256 Q2=144
#cache_dir diskd /ssd2/3 68000 32 256 Q1=256 Q2=144

cache_dir ufs /ssd/0 54000 128 512
cache_dir ufs /ssd/1 54000 128 512
cache_dir ufs /ssd/3 54000 128 512

cache_dir ufs /ssd2/0 68000 128 512
cache_dir ufs /ssd2/1 68000 128 512
cache_dir ufs /ssd2/3 68000 128 512

store_dir_select_algorithm round-robin
#cache_replacement_policy heap GDSF
#memory_replacement_policy heap GDSF

# Leave coredumps in the first cache dir
coredump_dir /var/cache/squid
# Add any of your own refresh_pattern entries above these.
# General Rules
#cache images

refresh_pattern -i \.(gif|png|ico|jpg|jpeg|jp2|webp)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private refresh-ims
refresh_pattern -i \.(jpx|j2k|j2c|fpx|bmp|tif|tiff|bif)$ 100000 90% 20000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private refresh-ims
refresh_pattern -i \.(pcd|pict|rif|exif|hdr|bpg|img|jif|jfif)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private refresh-ims
refresh_pattern -i \.(woff|woff2|eps|ttf|otf|svg|svgi|svgz|ps|ps1|acsm|eot)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private refresh-ims

#cache content
refresh_pattern -i \.(swf|js|ejs)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private refresh-ims
refresh_pattern -i \.(wav|css|class|dat|zsci|ver|advcs)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private refresh-ims

#cache videos
refresh_pattern -i \.(mpa|m2a|mpe|avi|mov|mpg|mpeg|mpg3|mpg4|mpg5)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private refresh-ims
refresh_pattern -i \.(m1s|mp2v|m2v|m2s|m2ts|wmx|rm|rmvb|3pg|3gpp|omg|ogm|asf|war)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private refresh-ims
refresh_pattern -i \.(asx|mp2|mp3|mp4|mp5|wmv|flv|mts|f4v|f4|pls|midi|mid)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private refresh-ims
refresh_pattern -i \.(htm|html)$ 9440 90% 200000 reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private refresh-ims
refresh_pattern -i \.(xml|flow|asp|aspx)$ 0 90% 200000 refresh-ims
refresh_pattern -i \.(json)$ 0 90% 200000 refresh-ims
refresh_pattern -i (/cgi-bin/|\?) 0 90% 200000

#live video cache rules
refresh_pattern -i \.(m3u8|ts)$ 0 90% 200000 refresh-ims

#cache specific sites
refresh_pattern -i ^http:\/\/liveupdate.symantecliveupdate.com.*\(zip)$ 0 0% 0
refresh_pattern -i ^http:\/\/premium.avira-update.com.*\(gz) 0 0% 0
refresh_pattern -i microsoft.com/.*\.(cab|exe|msi|msu|msf|asf|wma|dat|zip)$ 4320 80% 43200 reload-into-ims refresh-ims
refresh_pattern -i windowsupdate.com/.*\.(cab|exe|msi|msu|msf|asf|wma|wmv)|dat|zip)$ 4320 80% 43200 reload-into-ims refresh-ims
refresh_pattern -i windows.com/.*\.(cab|exe|msi|msu|msf|asf|wmv|wma|dat|zip)$ 4320 80% 43200 reload-into-ims refresh-ims
refresh_pattern -i apple.com/.*\.(cab|exe|msi|msu|msf|asf|wmv|wma|dat|zip|dist)$ 0 80% 43200 reload-into-ims refresh-ims

#cache binaries
refresh_pattern -i \.(app|bin|deb|rpm|drpm|exe|zip|zipx|tar|tgz|tbz2|tlz|iso|arj|cfs|dar|jar)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private refresh-ims
refresh_pattern -i \.(bz|bz2|ipa|ram|rar|uxx|gz|msi|dll|lz|lzma|7z|s7z|Z|z|zz|sz)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private refresh-ims
refresh_pattern -i \.(exe|msi)$ 0 90% 200000 refresh-ims
refresh_pattern -i \.(cab|psf|vidt|apk|wtex|hz|ova|ovf)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private refresh-ims

#cache microsoft and adobe and other documents
refresh_pattern -i \.(ppt|pptx|doc|docx|docm|docb|dot|pdf|pub|ps)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private refresh-ims
refresh_pattern -i \.(xls|xlsx|xlt|xlm|xlsm|xltm|xlw|csv|txt)$ 100000 90% 200000 override-expire reload-into-ims ignore-no-store ignore-private refresh-ims
#refresh_pattern -i ^ftp: 100000 90% 200000
#refresh_pattern -i ^gopher: 1440 0% 1440

#allow caching of other things based on cache control headers with some exceptions
refresh_pattern -i . 0 90% 200000 refresh-ims

log_icp_queries off
icp_port 0
htcp_port 0
acl snmppublic snmp_community public
snmp_port 3401
snmp_incoming_address x.x.x.x
snmp_access allow snmppublic all
minimum_object_size 0 KB
cache_effective_user squid
#header_replace User-Agent Mozilla/5.0 (X11; U;) Gecko/20080221 Firefox/2.0.0.9
vary_ignore_expire on
cache_swap_low 90
cache_swap_high 95
visible_hostname shadow
unique_hostname shadow-DHS
shutdown_lifetime 0 second
request_header_max_size 2048 KB
reply_header_max_size 2048 KB
request_entities on
half_closed_clients off
max_filedesc 65535
connect_timeout 15 seconds
cache_effective_group squid
buffered_logs on
#access_log /var/log/squid/access.log squid
access_log daemon:/var/log/squid/access.log buffer-size=1024KB
#access_log none
netdb_filename none
client_db off
dns_nameservers x.x.x.x x.x.x.x x.x.x.x
ipcache_size 10000
ipcache_low 90
ipcache_high 95
dns_v4_first on
negative_ttl 5 minutes
positive_dns_ttl 30 days
negative_dns_ttl 5 minutes
dns_retransmit_interval 1 seconds
check_hostnames off
forwarded_for delete
via off
httpd_suppress_version_string on
# mem and cache size
#collapsed_forwarding on
cache_mem 8 GB
memory_cache_mode disk
maximum_object_size 2 GB
maximum_object_size_in_memory 2 GB
digest_generation off
#digest_bits_per_entry 8
pinger_enable off
memory_pools on
max_stale 4 months


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[ISN] Overcoming paralysis – why financial services organisations have to race to update their Windows Server strategy

http://www.bobsguide.com/guide/news/2015/Jul/6/overcoming-paralysis-why-financial-services-organisations-have-to-race-to-update-their-windows-server-strategy.html By Dave Foreman, ECS, Practice Director Bob’s Guide July 6, 2015 Most of the technical support teams we work with know their Microsoft Server operating system inside out and have hardly lifted their phone to call Microsoft support in years. But this well-oiled machine is about to become IT departments’ biggest headache. With the end of Microsoft’s support for Server 2003 on July 14th 2015, migration from this rather old operating system has escalated from being a niggling worry to a high-risk agenda item. Only a handful of businesses have started their migration and even they will have to rely on Microsoft extended support. But this is not a cost-effective or risk-free option in the long term. At some point a new vulnerability in the operating system will be discovered and exploited; businesses will be exposed and the regulators will have a stronger case for non-compliance. According to the credit card industry’s PCI Security Council standards, if an unsupported operating system is Internet-facing, it will be logged as an automatic compliance failure. CIOs are caught between a rock and a hard place. Nobody wants to be caught in a position where they have to answer tough questions about plans to meet compliance and mitigate risk. […]


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[ISN] A Review of Common HIPAA Technical Safeguards

http://healthitsecurity.com/news/a-review-of-common-hipaa-technical-safeguards By Elizabeth Snell Health IT Security June 26, 2015 HIPAA technical safeguards are just one piece of the larger health data security plan that covered entities and their business associates must put together. However, it is a very important aspect. Over the next few weeks, HealthITSecurity.com will discuss some common examples of all three HIPAA safeguards, and how they could potentially benefit healthcare organizations. Not all types of safeguards are appropriate or necessary for every covered entity. But by having a comprehensive understanding of what is required by HIPAA and the HITECH Act, and how various safeguards can be used, organizations will be able to identify which ones are most applicable. From there, they can create and implement the right data security protections for their daily workflow and ensure they maintain HIPAA compliance. As previously mentioned, HIPAA technical safeguards are an important part to keeping sensitive health data secure. Whether a small primary care clinic is debating health data encryption options or a large HIE is considering BYOD for employees, understanding the basics of HIPAA technical safeguards is essential. What are HIPAA technical safeguards? The HIPAA Security Rule describes technical safeguards as ““the technology and the policy and procedures for its use that protect electronic protected health information and control access to it.” However, an important note is that the Security Rule does not require specific technology solutions. Rather, healthcare organizations need to determine reasonable and appropriate security measures for their own needs and characteristics. […]


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[ISN] Skytalks 2015 CFP – NOW OPEN

Forwarded from: bluknight < bluknight@skytalks.info> == https://skytalks.info == Skytalks is a ‘sub-conference’ that gives a unique platform for researchers to share their research, for angry hackers to rant about the issues of their industry, and for curious souls to probe interesting issues, all without the watchful eye of the rest of the world. With a strict, well-enforced “no recording” policy, research that is underway or critical of a vendor can be aired to your peers. You are talking to other security people, sharing your working knowledge of a topic. That said, this isn’t a soapbox to say and trash whoever or whatever you want. Skytalks is old-school DEF CON. We encourage handles – we want your material to stand on its own, not what company’s logo is on your slide deck. We encourage the audience to ask questions and challenge what does not seem to be right. Speakers will be held accountable for their material by their peers… loudly. We’re looking for talks that are about cutting edge material, either in-progress, or ready to be disclosed… at the risk of offending a company. Talks that challenge the industry norms are great. Calling out those who plague our beloved industry, welcome! Talks that are outside the realm of a PG rating, can find (and have found) a home here (was re: Teledildonics). First time speakers are welcome. We have had the privilege and honor of hosting for the first time some great names in the community. You, too, can be among that group. What you must bring: A compelling topic, slides, and willingness to educate and/or face your peers. You should be: outgoing, willing to educate, wanting to learn (yes, as a presenter), and wanting to engage your peers. If you lack any of these skills, we can fix this. Please bring a spare liver. A good talk is about mutual learning; it is a conversation. We just provide a room of professionals that want to converse, over booze. Sometimes… a lot of booze. Your submission must include a brief abstract that explains your talk. It must include a detailed outline of the major talking points. Optionally, you can give us additional information or arguments about why we should accept your talk. What we provide: A place to present, with projectors (VGA video). While we may have adapters on-hand, please be prepared and bring your own. We’ll have a PA system with appropriate microphones, as well as audio input from a device if you need it. Please let us know if you have any special requirements, such as a fire extinguisher for when you plan to set the table on fire. Please note: all speakers must already be badged Defcon attendees. Skytalks cannot provide DEF CON badges for speakers, and Skytalks badges, while great keepsakes, do not provide access to DEF CON itself. Also, dongs. == https://skytalks.info ==


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[ISN] Flawed Android factory reset leaves crypto and login keys ripe for picking

http://arstechnica.com/security/2015/05/flawed-android-factory-reset-leaves-crypto-and-login-keys-ripe-for-picking/ By Dan Goodin Ars Technica May 21, 2015 An estimated 500 million Android phones don’t completely wipe data when their factory reset option is run, a weakness that may allow the recovery of login credentials, text messages, e-mails, and contacts, computer scientists said Thursday. In the first comprehensive study of the effectiveness of the Android feature, Cambridge University researchers found that they were able to recover data on a wide range of devices that had run factory reset. The function, which is built into Google’s Android mobile operating system, is considered a crucial means for wiping confidential data off of devices before they’re sold, recycled, or otherwise retired. The study found that data could be recovered even when users turned on full-disk encryption. Based on the devices studied, the researchers estimated that 500 million devices may not fully wipe disk partitions where sensitive data is stored and 630 million phones may not wipe internal SD cards where pictures and video are often kept. The findings, published in a research paper titled Security Analysis of Android Factory Resets, are sure to be a wake-up call for individual users and large enterprises alike. […]


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[ISN] The FBI’s Stance on Encrypted Communications

http://blogs.wsj.com/experts/2015/04/20/the-fbis-stance-on-encrypted-communications/ By Amy Hess Executive Assistant Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Apr1l 20, 2015 {This post is in response to the article, Should Law Enforcement Have the Ability to Access Encrypted Communications} AMY HESS: Imagine an America where federal, state, and municipal law enforcement agencies cannot access critical communications, even when legally authorized to do so. Imagine a time when the police cannot pursue logical leads in electronic data to rescue a missing child, identify the co-conspirators of a massive fraud scheme, or obtain relevant evidence of an elected official’s public corruption. Imagine the injustice if a suspected criminal can hide incriminating communications without fear of discovery by the police, or if information that could exonerate an innocent party is inaccessible. With the move to ubiquitous encryption, that time is closer than you think. Increasingly, law enforcement investigations require some degree of access to encrypted communications—whether stored on a computer or mobile device, or transmitted over a communication service provider’s network—and that access is increasingly limited. The FBI firmly supports the development and adoption of robust encryption as a key tool to strengthen cybersecurity, secure commerce and trade, safeguard private information, and promote free expression and association. However, absolute encryption does not mean absolute safety. Terrorists and other criminals also use encryption to conceal and facilitate their crimes. No one in this country should be beyond the law. The notion that electronic devices and communications could never be unlocked or unencrypted – even when a judge has decided that the public interest requires accessing this data to find evidence — is troubling. It may be time to ask: Is that a cost we, as a society, are prepared to pay? […]


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