Tag Archives: Exploit

Gartner Provides Seven Steps Security Leaders Can Take to Deal With Spectre and Meltdown

Security and risk management leaders must take a pragmatic and risk-based approach to the ongoing threats posed by an entirely new class of vulnerabilities, according to Gartner, Inc. "Spectre" and "Meltdown" are the code names given to different strains of a new class of attacks that target an underlying exploitable design implementation inside the majority of computer chips manufactured over the last 20 years.

Gartner Survey Highlights the Developing Role of the Chief Information Officer in India

Digitalization and technological innovation are changing the nature of the job of the CIO, according to Gartner, Inc. Gartner's annual global survey of CIOs showed that the CIO role is transitioning from delivery executive to business executive, from controlling cost and engineering processes, to driving revenue and exploiting data.

[ISN] Bad movie: Hackers can raid networks with burnt Blu-Rays

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/03/02/bad_movie_hackers_can_raid_networks_with_burnt_blurays/ By Darren Pauli The Register 2 Mar 2015 British hacker Stephen Tomkinson has found two Blu-Ray-borne attacks. His first exploit relies on a poor Java implementation in a product called PowerDVD from CyberLink. PowerDVD plays DVDs on PCs and creates menus using Java, but the way Oracle’s code has been used allows naughty folk to circumvent Windows security controls. The result, the NCC Group consultant says, is that it’s possible to put executables onto Blu-Ray disks and to make those disks run automatically on startup even when Windows is set to stop that outcome. Users would have no reason to suspect the whirring of an optical drive indicated unknown software was running, making this a potentially nasty attack. […]


[ISN] Researchers uncover signs of Superfish-style attacks

http://www.computerworld.com/article/2889469/researchers-uncover-signs-of-superfish-style-attacks.html By Gregg Keizer Computerworld Feb 26, 2015 Researchers at the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) yesterday said that they had found evidence that implies attackers have exploited a security vulnerability in the Superfish adware and a slew of other programs. Superfish, a company that markets a visual search product, made the news last week when Lenovo was found to have pre-loaded the program on its consumer-grade PCs during a four-month span late last year. Lenovo has acknowledged that Superfish poses a security threat to customers, and has released a tool to eradicate the software. Microsoft, McAfee


[ISN] NIST outlines guidance for security of copiers, scanners

http://gcn.com/articles/2015/02/25/nist-replication-device-security.aspx By GCN Staff Feb 25, 2015 The National Institute of Standards and Technology announced its internal report 8023: Risk Management for Replication Devices is now available. The guidance covers protecting the information processed, stored or transmitted on replication devices (RDs), which are devices that copy, print or scan documents, images or objects. Because today’s RDs have the characteristics of computing devices (storage, operating systems, CPUs and networking) they are vulnerable to a number of exploits, NIST said. Among the threats to RDs are: […]


[ISN] Is this the future of cyberwarfare?

http://america.aljazeera.com/watch/shows/america-tonight/articles/2015/2/5/blackenergy-malware-cyberwarfare.html By Aaron Ernst Al Jazeera America February 5, 2015 Five years ago, the most sophisticated cyber weapon the world had ever seen ravaged Iran’s nuclear program. Allegedly developed by the U.S. and Israel, the complex virus infected the computer system that ran the centrifuges. Slight tweaks to the software caused hundreds of the centrifuges to self-destruct, setting the program back years. The malware was dubbed Stuxnet. Traditionally, foreign governments have used malware to spy and steal. But this was something entirely different. “Stuxnet, it is a weapon, it’s not ‘like’ a weapon,” says German computer security expert Ralph Langner, who was the first to identify how the virus worked. “It is a weapon because it was designed to cause physical damage.” Now, Langner worries that Stuxnet could come back to haunt the U.S. Those same vulnerabilities in Iran’s nuclear control systems that the malware exploited can be found in similar systems throughout America. […]


[ISN] The ZeroAccess botnet is back in business

http://www.computerworld.com/article/2877923/the-zeroaccess-botnet-is-back-in-business.html By Lucian Constantin IDG News Service Jan 30, 2015 A peer-to-peer botnet called ZeroAccess came out of a six-month hibernation this month after having survived two takedown attempts by law enforcement and security researchers. At its peak in 2013, ZeroAccess, also known as Sirefef, consisted of more than 1.9 million infected computers that were primarily used for click fraud and Bitcoin mining. That was until security researchers from Symantec found a flaw in the botnet’s resilient peer-to-peer architecture. This architecture allowed the bots to exchange files, instructions and information with each other without the need for central command-and-control servers, which are the Achilles’ heel of most botnets. By exploiting the flaw, Symantec managed to detach over half a million computers from ZeroAccess in July 2013 and launched an effort to clean them up in cooperation with ISPs and CERTs. […]


[ISN] Critical Ghost bug could haunt WordPress and PHP apps, too

http://arstechnica.com/security/2015/01/critical-ghost-bug-could-haunt-wordpress-and-php-apps-too/ By Dan Goodin Ars Technica Jan 30, 2015 Add PHP applications and the WordPress Web platform to the list of wares that may be susceptible to the critical Linux vulnerability known as Ghost. As Ars reported Wednesday, the flaw resided in a variety of Linux distributions, including Centos/RHEL/Fedora 5, 6, and 7 Ubuntu 12.04, and possibly other versions. The buffer overflow made its way into those distributions through the GNU C Library, specifically in its gethostbyname() and gethostbyname2() function calls. The bug made it possible to execute malicious code by sending malformed data to various applications and services running on vulnerable systems. Proof-of-concept attack code was able to exploit the vulnerability in the Exim mail server, and researchers widely suspected clockdiff, procmail, and pppd were also susceptible. Now, researchers from security firm Sucuri have expanded the list. “We also have good reasons to believe PHP applications might also be affected, through its gethostbyname() function wrapper,” Sucuri Senior Vulnerability Researcher Marc-Alexandre Montpas wrote in a blog post published Thursday. “An example of where this could be a big issue is within WordPress itself: it uses a function named wp_http_validate_url() to validate every pingback’s post URL… and it does so by using gethostbyname(). So an attacker could leverage this vector to insert a malicious URL that would trigger a buffer overflow bug, server-side, potentially allowing him to gain privileges on the server.” […]