Tag Archives: EDD

[ISN] Newly Fired CEO Of Norse Fires Back At Critics

www.darkreading.com/threat-intelligence/newly-fired-ceo-of-norse-fires-back-at-critics-/d/d-id/1324195 By Jai Vijayan DarkReading.com 2/4/2016 Critics maintain that Norse Corp. is peddling threat data as threat intelligence. A massive and potentially company-ending shakeup at security vendor Norse Corp. in recent weeks amid controversy over its practices may be a signal that the threat intelligence industry is finally maturing. KrebsonSecurity last week reported that Norse had fired its CEO Sam Glines after letting go some 30% of its staff less than a month earlier. The blog quoted unnamed sources as saying Norse’s board of directors had asked board member Howard Bain to take over as an interim CEO. The remaining employees at the Foster City, Calif.-based threat intelligence firm were apparently informed they could continue showing up for work, but there would be no guarantee they would be paid, KrebsonSecurity reported. Shortly thereafter, Norse’s website went dark and remained unavailable through the week




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[ISN] How much at risk is the U.S.’s critical infrastructure? (fwd)

www.csoonline.com/article/3024873/security/how-much-at-risk-is-the-uss-critical-infrastructure.html By Taylor Armerding CSO Jan 21, 2016 There is universal agreement that modern warfare or crime fighting is not just about bullets, bombs and missiles in physical space. It’s also about hacking in cyber space. But over the past decade there has been much less agreement over how much of a threat hackers are. On one side are those – some of them top government officials – who have warned that a cyber attack on the nation’s critical infrastructure could be catastrophic, amounting to a “cyber Pearl Harbor.” Those warnings prompted the recent book by retired ABC TV “Nightline” anchor Ted Koppel titled, “Lights Out: A Cyberattack, A Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath.” Other experts argue just as forcefully that while the threats are real and should be taken seriously, the risks are not even close to catastrophic. They say those who predict catastrophe are peddling FUD – fear, uncertainty and doubt. […]


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[ISN] Call for Papers – YSTS X – Information Security Conference, Brazil

Forwarded from: Luiz Eduardo Hello ISN readers and sorry for the possible cross-postings you might see, on behalf of the conference’s organization team I would like to let you know that YSTS X’s CFP is currently opened. Call for Papers – YSTS X – Information Security Conference, Brazil YSTS 10th Edition Where: Sao Paulo, Brazil When: June 13th, 2016 Call for Papers Opens: December 13th, 2015 Call for Papers Close: March 1st, 2016 www.ysts.org @ystscon INTRODUCTION This is the celebratory 10th edition of the well-known information security conference “you Sh0t the Sheriff” and we are sending this CFP out so you share with us the coolest stuff you’ve been working on. The conference will be happening on June, 13th in a secret location within the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. This is a great opportunity for you to speak about the latest research you have been working on to the most influential crowd in the Brazilian Information Security realm. ABOUT THE CONFERENCE you Sh0t the Sheriff is a very unique, one-day, event dedicated to bringing cutting edge talks to the top-notch professionals of the Braziiian Information Security Community. The conference’s main goal is to bring the attendees to the current state of the information security world by bringing the most relevant topics from different Infosec segments of the market and providing an environment that is ideal for both networking and idea sharing. YSTS is a an exclusive, mostly invite-only security con. Getting a talk accepted, will, not only get you to the event, but after you successfully present your talk, you will receive a challenge-coin that guarantees your entry to YSTS for as long as the conference exists. Due to the great success of the previous years’ editions, yes, we’re keeping the good old usual format: * YSTS 10 will be held at an almost secret location only announced to whom it may concern a couple of weeks before the con * the venue will be, most likely, a very cool club or a bar (seriously, look at the pictures) * appropriate environment to network with great security folks from Brazil and abroad * since it is a one-day con with tons of talks and activities, we make sure we fill everyone with coffee, food and booze CONFERENCE FORMAT Anything Information Security related is interesting for the conference, which will help us create a cool and diverse line-up. We strictly *do not* accept commercial/ product-related pitches. Keep in mind though, this is a one-day conference, we receive a lot of submissions, so your unique research with cool demos and any other possible twist you can throw in to keep the audience engaged will surely stand out to the other papers. Just in case you need some ideas, some of the topics in security that could be interesting to us: * Mobile Devices & BY0D – Bring your 0wn3d Device * Real Social Networking Threats * Embedded Systems * Everything in Offensive Security * “the” Cloud * Inside Jobs Detection/ Techniques * Big Data * Small Data * Tiny Data (the type that breaks big things) * Internet of all the things you can break * Career & Management topics * (cool and useful) Information Security Policies * Privacy in the Digital World * Messing with Network Protocols * RF Stuff * Mobile Payments * Authentication * Incident Response Stories and Policies * Information Warfare * Malware/ Botnets * DDoS Evolution or Stories (or solution, if you have one) * Secure Programming * Hacker Culture * Application Security * Virtualization * DataBase Security * Cryptography * System Weaknesses * Infrastructure and Critical Systems * Reverse Engineering * Social Reverse Engineering * Reversing Social Engineering * Caipirinha and Feijoada Hacks * and everything else information security related that our attendees would enjoy, the coolest/ different/ most creative submissions win, keep that in mind! We do like shorter talks, so please submit your talks and remember they must be 30 minutes long. (yes, we do strictly enforce that) We are also opened to some 15-minute talks, some of the smart people around might not need 30 minutes to deliver a message, or it might be a project that has been just kicked-off. 15 minutes might be your thing and that’s nothing to be ashamed about. you Sh0t the Sheriff is the perfect conference to release your new projects, other people have released very cool research before they presented it at the bigger cons later in the year. We also like that, a lot. And yes, we do prefer new hot-topics. “First-time” speakers are more than welcome. If you’ve got good content to present, that’s all that matters. SPEAKER PRIVILEGES (and yeah, that applies only to the 30 minute-long talks) * USD 1,000.00 to help covering travel expenses for international speakers * or R$ 1,200.00 to help covering travel expenses for Brazilian speakers who live outside of Sao Paulo * Breakfast, lunch and dinner during conference * Pre-and-post-conference official party (and the unofficial ones as well) * Auditing products in traditional Brazilian barbecue restaurants * Life-time free admission for all future YSTS conferences CFP IMPORTANT INFO (aka: RTFM) Each paper submission must include the following information * in text format only * * Abstract/ Presentation Title * Your Name, company/title, address, email and phone/contact number * Short biography * Summary or abstract for your presentation * Other publications or conferences where this material has been or will be published/submitted. * Speaking experience * Do you need or have a visa to come to Brasil? * is it a 30 minute or a 15 minute talk? * Technical requirements (others than LCD Projector) VERY IMPORTANT DATES Conference Date: June 13th, 2016 Final CFP Submission – March 1st, 2016 Final Notification of Acceptance – April 1st, 2016 Final Material Submission for accepted presentations – May 1st, 2016 (we might ask you to remotely present your talk to us at this date) All submissions must be sent via email, in text format only to: cfp/at/ysts.org IMPORTANT CONTACT INFORMATION Paper Submissions: cfp/at/ysts.org General Inquiries: b0ard/at/ysts.org Sponsorship Inquiries: sponsors/at/ysts.org OTHER STUFF Conference website www.ysts.org Video clips http://youtu.be/6ZblAdYZUGU http://youtu.be/ah-dLkwiK0Y tinyurl.com/ystsendorsements Some Pix tinyurl.com/ysts9pix tinyurl.com/ysts8pix tinyurl.com/ysts7pix1 tinnyurl.com/ysts5pix1 tinyurl.com/yoush0tthesheriff6 twitter @ystscon official twitter hashtag #ystscon We hope to see you there! Luiz Eduardo & Nelson Murilo & Willian Caprino


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[ISN] Legacy IT, legacy acquisition compound cyber risk

http://fcw.com/articles/2015/09/17/legacy-it-risk.aspx By Adam Mazmanian FCW.com Sep 17, 2015 The way the government buys technology can constrain efforts to protect federal systems from cybersecurity threats, says Michael Daniel, the top White House advisor on cybersecurity. Federal agencies continue to rely on legacy systems that are vulnerable to intrusions and hard to secure. “The burden of legacy in government is a huge one,” Daniel said at the Billington Cybersecurity Conference in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 17. Government is struggling with the problem of how to move off of old systems. “We have architectures and hardware and software in places that is indefensible, no matter how much money and talent we put on it. We don’t have a good process for moving off,” Daniel said. Security measures are often bolted on to older hardware, software and operating systems, “rather than being deeply embedded in the product,” Daniel said. Compounding the problem are legacy acquisition methods. “We treat computer systems as a gigantic capital investment like a building, rather than investments you need to continually refresh,” Daniel said. But moving to a more flexible budgeting and acquisition system, to allow for revolving funds and other more nimble financial instruments, requires new law. “We’re going to need some help from Congress. There’s a very strong resistance to making some of those shifts among a lot of folks on the Hill,” he said. […]


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[ISN] Some hackers make more than $80,000 a month — here’s how

http://www.businessinsider.com/we-found-out-how-much-money-hackers-actually-make-2015-7 By CALE GUTHRIE WEISSMAN Business Insider Jul. 14, 2015 It’s a known fact that hacking makes money. But how much money? And how do hackers carry out their internal dealings with one another so as not to step on each other’s toes? Much like the fine-tuned systems of mafias and gangs that act almost identically to businesses, hackers have also created their own extremely intricate systems — and the scale of their operations is astounding. Security researchers have been embedding themselves into these online underbellies to see precisely what’s going on. This way they can get an early look at the malware hackers are cooking up, while also learning just how the system works. The information security company Trustwave has been doing just this for years. It now has a lot to show for it, including discovering how much money a hacking gang makes and how precisely the cybercrime ecosystem works. Trustwave’s VP of Security Research Ziv Mador has put together a presentation he gives to customers so they can get a better handle on how to protect themselves. As he put it, it’s just a “glance of what we find.” But Mador has given Business Insider an exclusive look at the wheeling and dealing of hackers inside this secretive world — check it out below. […]


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[ISN] Massive leak reveals Hacking Team’s most private moments in messy detail

http://arstechnica.com/security/2015/07/massive-leak-reveals-hacking-teams-most-private-moments-in-messy-detail/ By Dan Goodin Ars Technica July 6, 2015 Privacy and human rights advocates are having a field day picking through a massive leak purporting to show spyware developer Hacking Team’s most candid moments, including documents that appear to contradict the company’s carefully scripted PR campaign. “Imagine this: a leak on WikiLeaks showing YOU explaining the evilest technology on earth! :-),” Hacking Team CEO David Vincenzetti wrote in a June 8 e-mail to company employees including Walter Furlan, whose LinkedIn profile lists him as the international sales engineer of the spyware developer. “You would be demonized by our dearest friends the activists, and normal people would point their fingers at you.” Other documents suggested the US FBI was among the customers paying for software that allowed targets to be surreptitiously surveilled as they used computers or smartphones. According to one spreadsheet first reported by Wired, the FBI paid Hacking Team more than $773,226.64 since 2011 for services related to the Hacking Team product known as “Remote Control Service,” which is also marketed under the name “Galileo.” One spreadsheet column listed simply as “Exploit” is marked “yes” for a sale in 2012, an indication Hacking Group may have bundled some sort of attack code that remotely hijacked targets’ computers or phones. Previously, the FBI has been known to have wielded a Firefox exploit to decloak child pornography suspects using Tor. Security researchers have also scoured leaked Hacking Team source code for suspicious behavior. Among the findings, the embedding of references to child porn in code related to the Galileo. […]


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[ISN] Why Cyber War Is Dangerous for Democracies

http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2015/06/hackers-cyber-china-russia/396812/ By MOISÉS NAÍM The Atlantic June 25, 2015 This month, two years after his massive leak of NSA documents detailing U.S. surveillance programs, Edward Snowden published an op-ed in The New York Times celebrating his accomplishments. The “power of an informed public,” he wrote, had forced the U.S. government to scrap its bulk collection of phone records. Moreover, he noted, “Since 2013, institutions across Europe have ruled similar laws and operations illegal and imposed new restrictions on future activities.” He concluded by asserting that “We are witnessing the emergence of a post-terror generation, one that rejects a worldview defined by a singular tragedy. For the first time since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, we see the outline of a politics that turns away from reaction and fear in favor of resilience and reason.” Maybe so. I am glad that my privacy is now more protected from meddling by U.S. and European democracies. But frankly, I am far more concerned about the cyber threats to my privacy posed by Russia, China, and other authoritarian regimes than the surveillance threats from Washington. You should be too. Around the time that Snowden published his article, hackers broke into the computer systems of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management and stole information on at least 4 million (and perhaps far more) federal employees. The files stolen include personal and professional data that government employees are required to give the agency in order to get security clearances. The main suspect in this and similar attacks is China, though what affiliation, if any, the hackers had with the Chinese government remains unclear. According to the Washington Post, “China is building massive databases of Americans’ personal information by hacking government agencies and U.S. health-care companies, using a high-tech tactic to achieve an age-old goal of espionage: recruiting spies or gaining more information on an adversary.” […]


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[ISN] Report: Hack of government employee records discovered by product demo

http://arstechnica.com/security/2015/06/report-hack-of-government-employee-records-discovered-by-product-demo/ By Sean Gallagher Ars Technica June 11, 2015 As officials of the Obama administration announced that millions of sensitive records associated with current and past federal employees and contractors had been exposed by a long-running infiltration of the networks and systems of the Office of Personnel Management on June 4, they claimed the breach had been found during a government effort to correct problems with OPM’s security. An OPM statement on the attack said that the agency discovered the breach as it had “undertaken an aggressive effort to update its cybersecurity posture.” And a DHS spokesperson told Ars that “interagency partners” were helping the OPM improve its network monitoring “through which OPM detected new malicious activity affecting its information technology systems and data in April 2015.” Those statements may not be entirely accurate. According to a Wall Street Journal report, the breach was indeed discovered in April. But according to sources who spoke to the WSJ’s Damian Paletta and Siobhan Hughes, it was in fact discovered during a sales demonstration of a network forensics software package called CyFIR by its developer, CyTech Services. “CyTech, trying to show OPM how its cybersecurity product worked, ran a diagnostics study on OPM’s network and discovered malware was embedded on the network,” Paletta and Hughes reported. And, according to federal investigators, that malware may have been in place for over a year. US intelligence agencies have joined the investigation into the breach. But it’s still not even clear what data was accessed by the attackers. Meanwhile, the breach has triggered outrage from unions representing federal employees. In a letter to OPM Director Katherine Archuleta, American Federation of Government Employees president J. David Cox expressed displeasure at the way OPM had handled the breach, calling the 18 months of credit monitoring and $1 million liability insurance OPM is offering federal employees “entirely inadequate, either as compensation or protection from harm.” […]


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