Tag Archives: door

[ISN] NASA, Dept of Defense, Commerce etc probed over use of backdoored Juniper kit

www.theregister.co.uk/2016/01/26/juniper_us_government/ By Chris Williams The Register 26 Jan 2016 A bunch of US government departments and agencies – from the military to NASA – are being grilled over their use of backdoored Juniper firewalls. The House of Representatives’ Committee on Oversight and Government Reform fired off letters to top officials over the weekend, demanding to know if any of the dodgy NetScreen devices were used in federal systems. Juniper’s ScreenOS software – the firmware that powers in its firewalls – was tampered with by mystery hackers a few years ago to introduce two vulnerabilities: one was an administrator-level backdoor accessible via Telnet or SSH using a hardcoded password, and the other allowed eavesdroppers to decrypt intercepted VPN traffic. The flaws, which were smuggled into the source code of the firmware, were discovered on December 17 by Juniper, and patches were issued three days later to correct the faults. The backdoor (CVE-2015-7755) affects ScreenOS versions 6.3.0r17 through 6.3.0r20, and the weak VPN encryption (CVE-2015-7756) affects ScreenOS 6.2.0r15 through 6.2.0r18 and 6.3.0r12 through 6.3.0r20. […]




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[ISN] [THOTCON] Tickets and After Party Update

Forwarded from: THOTCON *** BEGIN THOTCON TRANSMISSION Greetings: The Call for Papers (CFP) has closed and we are now in the process of reading through a record number of entries. We are working very hard to make this the best con we’ve ever put on for you.  ICYMI: A few weeks ago we announced that the Chicago rock chip-tune band I Fight Dragons will be performing live at the THOTCON 0x7 After Party. This party/concert which is fully funded by our sponsors is open to all attendees of the conference. It will take place Friday, May 6th 2016 at 8:30pm (about 3 hours after the closing remarks). Tons of food, candy (a shit ton of it), and full open bar will be provided.  Tickets have been selling out at a record pace. The only level that remains available is General Admittance (GA) and as of the writing of this update only 358 tickets remain. When those tickets are gone, we will be 100% sold out. No more tickets will be issued.  Note: We do not sell tickets at the door, so please don’t wait. Get your tickets ASAP!!! The next announcement will be in early February when we announce the first batch of our speaker line up. 


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[ISN] Hacking Team’s Leak Helped Researchers Hunt Down a Zero-Day

www.wired.com/2016/01/hacking-team-leak-helps-kaspersky-researchers-find-zero-day-exploit/ By Kim Zetter Security Wired.com 01/13/16 ZERO-DAY EXPLOITS ARE a hacker’s best friend. They attack vulnerabilities in software that are unknown to the software maker and are therefore unpatched. Criminal hackers and intelligence agencies use zero day exploits to open a stealth door into your system, and because antivirus companies also don’t know about them, the exploits can remain undetected for years before they’re discovered. Until now, they’ve usually been uncovered only by chance. But researchers at Kaspersky Lab have, for the first time, discovered a valuable zero-day exploit after intentionally going on the hunt for it. And they did so by using only the faintest of clues to find it. The malware they found is a remote-code execution exploit that attacks a vulnerability in Microsoft’s widely used Silverlight software—a browser plug-in Netflix and other providers use to deliver streaming content to users. It’s also used in SCADA and other industrial control systems that are installed in critical infrastructure and industrial facilities. The vulnerability, which Microsoft called “critical” in a patch released to customers on Tuesday, would allow an attacker to infect your system after getting you to visit a malicious website where the exploit resides—usually through a phishing email that tricks you into clicking on a malicious link. The attack works with all of the top browsers except Chrome—but only because Google removed support for the Silverlight plug-in in its Chrome browser in 2014. […]


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[ISN] Someone could have stolen your Wi-Fi password from this Internet of Things doorbell

thenextweb.com/gadgets/2016/01/12/now-someone-can-steal-your-wi-fi-password-from-your-doorbell/ [I called this back around September 2013 when Jamie Siminoff went on ABC’s “Shark Tank” pitching DoorBot, later rebranded to Ring. https://twitter.com/c4i/status/401534203755765760 – WK] By Owen Williams thenextweb.com 01/14/16 Getting hacked sucks, but there’s something worse than that: getting hacked because of your own smart doorbell. Ring is a popular smart doorbell that allows you to unlock your door from your phone, as well as see and hear visitors via a webcam. Unfortunately for Ring, that same doorbell meant you could have had your Wi-Fi password stolen in a few minutes if someone cracked into the physical doorbell According to Pen Test Partners, the attack was relatively trivial. To steal the password, it took removing the doorbell from the door using two screws, flipping it over and pushing the orange set-up button. […]


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[ISN] “Unauthorized code” in Juniper firewalls decrypts encrypted VPN traffic

arstechnica.com/security/2015/12/unauthorized-code-in-juniper-firewalls-decrypts-encrypted-vpn-traffic/ By Dan Goodin Ars Technica Dec 17, 2015 An operating system used to manage firewalls sold by Juniper Networks contains unauthorized code that surreptitiously decrypts traffic sent through virtual private networks, officials from the company warned Thursday. It’s not clear how the code got there or how long it has been there. An advisory published by the company said that NetScreen firewalls using ScreenOS 6.2.0r15 through 6.2.0r18 and 6.3.0r12 through 6.3.0r20 are affected and require immediate patching. Release notes published by Juniper suggest the earliest vulnerable versions date back to at least 2012 and possibly earlier. There’s no evidence right now that the backdoor was put in other Juniper OSes or devices. “During a recent internal code review, Juniper discovered unauthorized code in ScreenOS that could allow a knowledgeable attacker to gain administrative access to NetScreen devices and to decrypt VPN connections,” Juniper Chief Information officer Bob Worrall wrote. “Once we identified these vulnerabilities, we launched an investigation into the matter, and worked to develop and issue patched releases for the latest versions of ScreenOS.” A separate advisory from Juniper says there are two separate vulnerabilities, but stops short of describing either as “unauthorized code.” The first flaw allows unauthorized remote administrative access to an affected device over SSH or telnet. Exploits can lead to complete compromise. “The second issue may allow a knowledgeable attacker who can monitor VPN traffic to decrypt that traffic,” the advisory said. “It is independent of the first issue. There is no way to detect that this vulnerability was exploited.” […]


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[ISN] HACKFEST 2015 – REGISTRATION & TRAININGS

HACKFEST 2015 – REGISTRATION & TRAININGS Hackfest 2015, November 6-7th Quebec City, Canada www.hackfest.ca REGISTRATION Online registration close on November 1st. – Current price is 80$CAD+tx  – Register in group to have a discount – Register now: www.hackfest.ca/en/register TRAININGS We have interesting trainings offered at Hackfest in Quebec city, Canada this year.   The price also includes admission to talks. NOVEMBER 5th Hunting Linux malware for fun and $flags Server-side Linux malware is a real threat now. Unfortunately, as for its Windows counterpart, most system administrators are inadequately trained or don’t have enough time allocated by their management to analyze and understand the threats that their infrastructures are facing. This tutorial aims at creating an environment where Linux professionals have the opportunity to study such threats safely and in a time-effective fashion. In this introductory tutorial you will learn to fight real-world Linux malware that targets server environments. Attendees will have to find malicious processes and concealed backdoors in a compromised Web server. In order to make the tutorial accessible for a range of skill levels several examples of malware will be used with increasing layers of complexity — from scripts to ELF binaries with varying degrees of obfuscation. Additionally, as is common in Capture-The-Flag information security competitions, flags will be hidden throughout the environment for attendees to find. Skills to acquire: * Live system incident response and forensics using Linux’s standard tools * System hardening * Introduction to reverse-engineering obfuscated scripts and binaries Price: * 150$ Regular (ID required) * 75$ Student (ID & Student proof required) Presented by: Olivier Bilodeau and Marc-Etienne M.Léveillé both are malware researchers at ESET Montreal Register now :http://www.hackfest.ca/en/training/hunting_linux_malware_for_fun_and_flags- 2015


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[ISN] Healthcare sector 340% more prone to IT security threats

http://www.computerweekly.com/news/4500254005/Healthcare-sector-340-more-prone-to-IT-security-threats By Bryan Glick Editor in Chief ComputerWeekly.com 23 Sep 2015 Healthcare organisations are 340% more likely to be hit by an IT security incident than the average across all sectors, and 200% more likely to experience data theft, according to research. Medical information sells for 10 times more than other data on the black market, making it a key target for cyber criminals, according to the study from supplier Raytheon|Websense. The figures come from analysing telemetry feeds from healthcare organisations all over the world, as part of the five billion daily security events identified by the firm’s threat intelligence network. Hackers are much more likely to use certain forms of malware to target healthcare organisations: They are 450% more likely than average to be hit by the Cryptowall ransomware, a Trojan that encrypts files on a user’s device and asks for payment to release the data. The Dyre “man in the middle” malware turns up 300% more often in healthcare – a phishing attack that directs users to fake banking websites to steal their login details. And Dropper, which leaves malware to open up backdoors onto systems, appears 376% more in healthcare – in the first half of this year, 83% of all Dropper incidents worldwide took place in the sector, according to the Websense survey. […]


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[ISN] Wireless Hacking In Flight: Air Force Demos Cyber EC-130

http://breakingdefense.com/2015/09/wireless-hacking-in-flight-air-force-demos-cyber-ec-130/ By SYDNEY J. FREEDBERG JR. Breaking Defense September 15, 2015 NATIONAL HARBOR: Matthew Broderick in his basement, playing Wargames over a landline, is still the pop culture archetype of a hacker. But as wireless networks became the norm, new-age cyber warfare and traditional electronic warfare are starting to merge. Hackers can move out of the basement to the sky. In a series of experiments, the US Air Force has successfully modified its EC-130 Compass Call aircraft, built to jam enemy transmissions, to attack enemy networks instead. “We’ve conducted a series of demonstrations,” said Maj. Gen. Burke Wilson, commander of the 24th Air Force, the service’s cyber operators. “Lo and behold! Yes, we’re able to touch a target and manipulate a target, [i.e.] a network, from an air[craft].” What’s more, Wilson told reporters at the Air Force Association conference here, this flying wireless attack can “touch a network that in most cases might be closed” to traditional means. While he didn’t give details, many military networks around the world are deliberately disconnected from the Internet (“air-gapped”) for better security. You can try to get an agent or dupe to bring a virus-infected thumb drive to work, as reportedly happened with Stuxnet’s penetration of the Iranian nuclear program, but that takes time and luck. You unlock a lot more virtual doors if you can just hack a network wirelessly from the air. Israeli aircraft using BAE’s Suter system reportedly did just this to Syrian air defenses in 2007’s Operation Orchard, and the Navy is interested in the capability, but this is the first I’ve heard an Air Force general discuss it. Digital AESA radar can do much the same thing, as we’ve reported about the F-35. […]


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